[INFOGRAPHIC]: How to Overcome Your Fear of Public Speaking 

11 10 2017

Delivering a presentation in front of a live audience demands a great deal of self-confidence that allows the orator to overcome his fears of failing. In public speaking, and in life if you do not perform a task perfectly, you might face a minor setback but you are able to accomplish the overall goal, as long as you try.

Sometimes the fear of failing can have bigger repercussions than actually failing.

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While delivering a presentation, you might make small mistakes that you can instantly correct in the next moment or you might forget to mention an important point in the right sequence but that should not discourage you from trying. If you make a mistake, learn from the experience and make your next presentation better.

Check out this infographic from Malcolm Andrews; an ideal resource for any budding public speaker who is interested in refining their presentation skills.

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The Biggest Challenges Young Entrepreneurs Face Today

19 09 2017

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Being an entrepreneur is undoubtedly difficult at any age, but the reality is that younger individuals may face even more challenges simply because of their age. As an entrepreneur, you must struggle to find a competitive edge for your business and get your company established in a tough marketplace. However, in addition to all of the typical challenges that an entrepreneur may face, you may also face age-related challenges that make it difficult for you to be successful and secure in a competitive business climate. These are some of the most significant disadvantages that you may face as a younger entrepreneur.

  1. Financing Your Venture

Most entrepreneurs struggle to get the funding they need to successfully launch and grow their business. One of the most common steps that entrepreneurs take to get financing is to seek financiers and investors. However, you will need to develop an amazing business plan and deliver an impressive sales pitch in order to obtain the money that you need.

Some entrepreneurs will use their own capital to fund their venture. However, this is even more challenging for younger entrepreneurs in many cases because of their limited means. In addition, some younger entrepreneurs may still have student loans to pay off, and this debt can eat away at the funds that are available to launch a new business.

As a young entrepreneur, you need to have a healthy and realistic expectation about the profitability of your venture. Remember that very few ventures generate an instant profit. Instead, it is much more realistic to begin to turn a profit within two years. You should always have an emergency fund on hand to pay for your expenses in a worst-case scenario.

  1. Age Stereotypes

As a young business professional, you likely have already encountered at least a few age-related stereotypes. For example, you may be stereotyped as being lazy or irresponsible because of your age. You may find it difficult to get older professionals to take you seriously or to think of your venture as being credible.

It can be difficult to overcome this type of stereotype immediately. Perhaps the best thing that you can do is to prove your doubters wrong over time. Through your words and actions, show your colleagues that you are a hard worker and that your idea is a lucrative one. Eventually, you will find that your colleagues start to believe in your abilities and begin to endorse and support you.

  1. Social Rejection

Another challenging obstacle that you may face as an entrepreneur relates to social rejection from family and friends. Your family and friends may not understand what you are trying to accomplish through your business, and they may not immediately support you. Because of this, you can easily feel isolated and as though nobody supports you.

While you may feel isolated from family and friends, you can network with other entrepreneurs to gain the support and friendship that you desire. However, remember that family and friends are still important and deserve your time. Eventually, these individuals will begin to support your efforts as well.

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  1. Criticism

Self-doubt is common for entrepreneurs, so you certainly do not need to hear unsolicited criticism. You may even hear criticism that dissuades you from pursuing your dreams or trying to grow your business. Some older professionals who failed with their attempts at entrepreneurial activities or who feel threatened by your opportunity for success may try to steer you on the wrong path.

It is important for you to sift through the advice that you receive. Avoid taking all advice wholeheartedly, and let some words simply run off of your back. Focus on the words of advice that will serve you well and that you can learn from. If you receive any advice that does nothing more than discourages you or dissuades you from moving forward with your goals, simply disregard that advice and move forward with a clear mind.

  1. Hiring Employees for the First Time

Young entrepreneurs will be faced with the task of hiring employees for the first time, and this can be a stressful and intimidating prospect. There is a learning curve associated with interviewing and selecting the right candidates as well as with training the successful candidates properly. Keep in mind that your talent pool does not need to be limited to your local area. If you open your mind up to the possibility of hiring remote workers, you will have an even larger talent pool to explore. A remote workforce may also save you money in utilities and other forms of overhead.

Remember to think about the type of company culture that you want to create before you hire your first employer. Your interview process, training regimen and other aspects of the onboarding process should reflect this culture.

  1. Acquiring Customers

All new startups can have trouble attracting new customers. Untested brands may not have the market power that tried and true brands have. In some cases, established entrepreneurs may be able to use their recognition to attract customers to a new venture, but younger entrepreneurs do not have this benefit.

Young entrepreneurs should focus heavily on providing customers with quality products and services. Because value may come into question, they may need to find a way to offer products and services to the marketplace at a slightly better price than what the competition is currently offering without impacting quality.

Being a younger entrepreneur may seemingly have a few disadvantages, but remember that you also have a few positive things working in your favor. For example, you may have perseverance, enthusiasm and perhaps even a technological edge that you can use to your benefit. Be patient, and plan to work hard to overcome your challenges as you get your new venture off of the ground.

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Jen McKenzie!!****

Jen

About the author: Jen McKenzie is a freelance writer from New York, NY. She is fascinated by all things having to do with words, business, education and cutting-edge. When Jennifer is not busy writing, she enjoys taking long walks and spending time with her two pets Brando & Marlon. You can reach Jennifer @jenmcknzie

 

Image sources

  1. https://pixabay.com/en/laptop-woman-coffee-breakfast-943558/#_=_
  2. https://www.pexels.com/photo/adult-business-desk-document-296886/

 





14 Amazing Ways to Make Your Resume Stand Out from the Crowd

15 08 2017

 

It’s a crowded job market and everyone is fiercely fighting for a piece of the pie. The average recruiter spends approximately six seconds reviewing every resume that crosses his desk. When you have a pile of resumes a foot high, you simply don’t have more time to give each resume.

This means that the standard, boring resume created in Microsoft Word isn’t going to cut it. In today’s competitive market, you need more than a template.

If you’re going to stand out amidst the obscene pile of resumes on a desk, you need to take serious steps. You need to get creative. To think different. To work outside the box. Maybe even to shatter the box altogether.

As it says over at CareerMine:

First impressions count, and the first impression that a potential employer will have of you is going to depend on how you present your resume. This is going to be your one and only chance to capture a potential employer’s attention, or for your resume to be tossed into the file of those they don’t want to pursue.

It’s not just about showing off your experience or education, although those things are certainly important. A great resume demonstrates the type of person you are. Your creativity. Your insight. Your willingness to think big and take bold action.

You may be thinking, I’m not going into a creative profession, so why do I need a creative resume? You need a creative resume because creativity is NOT the norm, especially in business positions. Thousands of people can follow accounting principles, but there aren’t many creative accountants (who aren’t in jail). Creativity sets you apart in the workplace.

With each resume, we’ve included a key takeaway that can be applied to any resume in any industry. You may not be an out-of-the-box thinker, but you can let these lessons push you as you create your own resume.

With that in mind, we’ve put together a list of 14 amazing examples of resumes. These are for your inspiration,  not your duplication. They should inspire you, not intimidate you. You don’t need to copy these ideas or try to replicate them. Simply learn from them.

#1 THE HAND-DRAWN INFOGRAPHIC

This gorgeous, hand-drawn infographic from Roberta Cicerone shows off her art abilities both in print form and on the web. Combining both a whimsical sensibility with a subtle sense of self promotion, this would clearly make an impression upon even the most cold-hearted recruiter.

Key Takeaway: Don’t be afraid to put your personality into your resume, whether that’s whimsical, humorous or analytical. Even if you’re applying for a more traditional job, such as accounting, include bits of your personality so potential employers can get a feel for you.

#2 THE ENVELOPE FOLDOUT PORTFOLIO

This foldout envelope portfolio from Stefania Capellupo is absolutely breathtaking, combining a series of envelopes, classy infographics and well-designed 5×8 cards. This resume/portfolio creates a sense of mystery and intrigue as each envelope is opened.

Key Takeaway: Do everything you can to make your resume legitimately interesting and intriguing. For example, if you’re in computer programming, you could create a small program within the resume just for the recruiter.

#3 THE KID ON A MISSION

This personal branding piece by Matthew Lynch proves that he has both courage and creativity in equal proportion. Combining a series of eye-catching graphics, humorous phrases and appropriate personal information, there’s no way a design studio could not be impressed by him.

Key Takeaway: If you only have 6 seconds to catch the attention of a recruiter, using color and graphics is a great place to start. You don’t have to be a designer to use these in your resume. There are numerous templates available that include graphics.

#4 THE RESUME BOOK

This resume book shows some serious passion and serious dedication. Not only are the images gorgeous, but the fact that Paula Del Mas took the time to get a booklet printed shows that she is clearly willing to go the extra mile. This is exactly what companies are hoping to find in a resume. It’s not just about the information, it’s also about the person.

Key Takeaway: Remember, your resume isn’t just communicating facts and information. It’s communicating something about you as a person, including your work ethic.

#5 THE GQ COVER

When Sumukh Mehta decided that he wanted to work for GQ men’s magazine, he decided to take drastic action. For three weeks, the 21 year old worked diligently to produce a resume that looked exactly like an issue of the magazine. This incredibly hard work paid off, resulting in him getting a six-month paid internship at GQ.

Key Takeaway: Study the company at which you’re applying. If possible, tailor your resume just for that company. Are you applying at a marketing firm that values analytics? Shape tailor your resume to highlight your analytics skills.

#6 THE CARD SAMPLES

These cards on a ring are a perfect example of the fact that a resume doesn’t need to fit the traditional size or look. By stringing together these colorful cards, Rebecca Fisk created a resume that is both pleasing to the eye and easy to read. This particular one would certainly stick out from a stack of papers simply by its shape and size.

Key Takeaway: Don’t be afraid to break from tradition when it comes to the format or medium of your resume. For example, if applying for an accounting position, you could create a resume in the form of an annual report.

#7 THE POP-UP FOLDER

When applying for a job as a visual designer, what better way to get people’s attention than by focusing on an image of an eye? By using unique imagery and an intriguing layout, Matthew Stucky demonstrated his ability to think differently than other visual designers. Plus, who doesn’t like the excitement of opening one envelope after another? It’s like Christmas!

Key Takeaway: Consider using imagery that is appropriate for the job you’re hoping to get. Again, numerous templates are available for use in any industry.

#8 THE SPY RESUME

Stanley Cheah Yu Xuan hit it out of the ballpark with this one. By creating a resume in the style of a spy or CIA profile (even including his fingerprints!), Xuan created one of the most unique resumes out there. The fingerprints alone would be enough to get attention.

Key Takeaway: Look for ways to incorporate small, unique touches into your resume that will demonstrate who you are.

#9 THE MINIMALIST RESUME

By tastefully using a minimalist font and generous white space, Cristina Cardoso managed to create a resume that contains all the necessary information and is easy on the eyes. By having her first name only at the top of the resume in a unique font, it sets it apart from the rest of the sheet.

Key Takeaway: Consider your use of whitespace and margins. You want your resume to be easy to read. This is true no matter what job you’re applying for. You don’t want your resume to be difficult on the eyes.

#10 THE TOP SECRET REPORT

Vidar Olufsen hit upon a brilliant idea when he created his resume in the form of a top secret report from the “Agency of Consideration and Establishment for Graphic Designers.”

In his own words: A combined resume and open job application formed as a humorous “Top Secret” report, giving away information about a “newly educated and creative designer, who have settled in the city.” This is a self-promotion project that was made to display a variety of skills as a graphic designer and get attention from local design agencies after I finished my studies.

Two words: mission accomplished.

Key Takeaway: When it’s appropriate, consider stepping way outside the box. You’ll want to do some research beforehand to know if it’s appropriate given your potential employer, but it can be a great way to stand out.

#11 THE FLOWCHART

To highlight what he could add to a potential employer, Craig Baute created this unique flowchart. It tactfully suggests potential problems the company may have, then shows how Craig will solve those problems. It positions him as a problem solver and leader and demonstrates his willingness to use his skills in a variety of ways.

Key Takeaway: Your resume should demonstrate both your skillset and how those skills will serve a potential employer. This shows that you’ve researched the employer and presented how you fit well within their organization.

#12 UP IN LIGHTS

HR specialist Liz Hickok was trying to get an HR job but was having trouble getting the attention of employers. So what did she do? She used Christmas lights and the front of her house to spell out both. Not only did she get lots of well wishes on LinkedIn, she also landed 4 different interviews.

Key Takeaway: When it comes to applying for a job, consider reaching out in a variety of ways. Obviously, you don’t want to be annoying about it, but you do want to broadcast yourself as much as possible.

#13 THE STORY

Pam Bailey, a communications expert, used her expertise as a storyteller to set herself apart from the competition. By including quotes, awards, and professional achievements, she demonstrates both her knowledge of marketing and her many accomplishments.

Key Takeaway: You resume must be centered around your expertise, demonstrating the incredible value you’ll add to a potential employer. Do you have stock investment expertise? Show that on your resume.

#14 THE GOOGLE ANALYTICS REPORT

As an online marketer, Simon Fortunini wanted to show off his skills in a way that would resonate with other online marketers, so he created a resume website that looks like Google Analytics. Each section was clickable and included further information about Simon, making it both eye-catching and simple to navigate.

Key Takeaway: Create a resume in a format that will be immediately interesting and recognizable to those in your industry. For example, if you’re in HR you could create a resume in the form of a personnel report.

CONCLUSION

Obviously, each of these key takeaways must be taken with a grain of salt. Most of these resumes were used to apply for work in creative industries. Nevertheless, the overall lessons can be applied across a variety of industries.

The point is simply this: your resume needs to stand out.

In whatever ways are appropriate for your industry, your resume still needs to stand out from the crowd. Recruiters, managers and HR reps are all deluged in resumes. It can be difficult to determine who really stands out from a group.

By learning from these resumes, you have a chance to get the attention you deserve.

****For this amazing post, Campus to Career thanks Jason Clayton!!!****

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Jason Clayton (M.Ed.) is dean of career and life calling at Cornerstone University. With more than 14 years of higher education experience, Jason equips students to find and develop their unique capacities in order to meet the 21st century talent needs of employers.

You can find the original post, along with many other articles, here.





4 Little Ways to Stand Out As an Intern

25 07 2017

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Competition for an internship is quite high. And, the rules for getting your resume noticed have changed considerably. The key to getting a clear shot at a coveted internship is to stand out in the crowd of resumes and applications. First, it is important to remember the rules of marketing. You’ve got to focus on creating a product that the consumer desires, encouraging the reader to pay just a bit more attention to your marketing package or your resume.

1. Check Your Marketing Package

Surprisingly, a large number of applicants seeking an internship are losing out because they are not taking a serious look at their resume, they fail to update their resume, or they do not have a resume. Remember, the resume, cover-letter, and application is your marketing package to the recruiter. It should provide the necessary information that demonstrates that you are the right person for the internship. Certainly, well-crafted resume without grammatical errors will open the door to an interview. Check your resume over carefully with spell-check and your own eyes several times before submitting.

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2. Experience Seals The Deal

Recent graduates and college students might assume that they do not have the experience required to seal the internship deal. Think again. Any relevant experience will get you one step closer to that internship. Don’t dismiss a part-time job that you held during the summer or after school. Even your volunteer experience with an organization might work in your favor. For example, if you are pressing for an internship with a fashion magazine, impress the reader with your experience writing a fashion blog, publishing your own newsletter, or writing for a college newspaper. These jobs definitely provided valuable experience.

Related post: Get Involved, Get Experience

3. Apply Early

It’s surprising, the number of people that delay applying for internships. The fact is that a growing number of organizations and business institutions actively seek qualified interns all throughout the year. This is good news for those that were worried about the high competition that erupts for those summer internships at some leading organizations. Here is an idea. Select several organizations that are actively recruiting interns through the year to increase the odds that you will get selected.

4. Perfect Your Interview Skills

Perhaps, you’ve sent out your glowing cover letter and resume that highlights all your wonderful skills, training, education, and accomplishments. The recruiter has contacted you for an interview. Mission accomplished. Well, not so fast. Now, it’s time to brush up on your interview skills to seal the deal. Clearly, it’s vital to make a good first impression with the recruiter. Dress appropriately for the interview. Always arrive on time for the interview. Take note of your body language too. For example, make eye contact with the recruiter, offer a firm handshake, try to appear comfortable and relaxed during the entire interview session.

Remember, the interviewer will probably have all your information in front of them. Summarize the highlights of your information. Let the interviewer lead the interview. Don’t try to take control and look too desperate. Listen to the interviewer and make sure that you understand the questions, before providing an answer. Try to look confident and maintain a pleasant smile throughout the interview. End the interview with a firm handshake.

Later on, send a thank you note to the interviewer to confirm your interest in the internship with the company. Following the tips in this piece should lead you to accomplish your goals and landing that dream internship with a great company.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS BONUS RESOURCES ON RESUMES, INTERVIEW TIPS, + MORE!

****For this great post, Campus to Career thanks Helen Cartwright!!****

Helen Cartwright

Helen Cartwright is a passionate blogger, who excels in the Digital Marketing, Technology and Template Ideas niche. When not wired in marketing strategies she ghost-write for a variety of authors who have their work published on leading online media channels such as The Huffington Post and Entrepreneur.com.





Using Your Grad Enthusiasm to Find Your First Promising Job

14 06 2017

When you graduate from college, you enter a whole new world. It’s fun. The opportunities are practically limitless. Where will you head to? Whatever you want to be, you can become. However, you’ll have to go through a real struggle before you get there.

The moment you start searching for your first job, you’ll realize you were overly optimistic. During periods of labor market weaknesses (we’re still recovering from the Great Recession), the young workforce faces a disproportionate increase in unemployment. Currently, the unemployment rate for college graduates is 5.6%. Many of the employed ones (12.6% of them, to be precise) are underemployed.

Does this mean it’s impossible to get that ideal first job you were dreaming of? Wait, where did your enthusiasm go? That initial enthusiasm you have when you graduate from college is your factor of attraction.

Grad Enthusiasm Article

You’re Young, Smart, and Promising! Use Your Enthusiasm to Get into the Job Market!

If you start looking through job ads, you’ll notice most of them prefer experience. The entry-level positions are meant for applicants with no experience, but you feel like you’re overqualified for them. The lack of experience is a serious drawback when you compete on the job market. But let’s see: what makes you better than an older candidate with experience competing for the same position?

  • Your knowledge is fresh. You just took many exams and wrote outstanding projects. The academic writing standards are much higher today. If you’re a great writer, you can highlight that fact in the resume.
  • You have no fear of challenges. You know the real world is full of them. You know that college didn’t prepare you for all of them. You’re ready to face what you need to face and stay persistent through the challenges. A potential employer clearly sees that advantage in young applicants.
  • You can fully commit yourself to the job. Chances are, you still don’t have a family. Most recent graduates don’t have family plans in near future. This may seem discriminating, but employers would gladly accept such a candidate over someone who cannot stay overtime because they have a baby at home.

How to Show Your Enthusiasm and Get That First Job

  1. Start Your Search Right Away

If you still haven’t started searching for a job, you should start doing it before you lose your initial enthusiasm. Now is the right time to start sending applications! If you really need a vacation, don’t make it longer than a month.

  1. Highlight Your Skills and Knowledge

Since you don’t have much experience to brag with, you’ll have to balance the resume out. You can do that by writing a functional resume that highlights your skills and knowledge.

Maybe you don’t have any work experience, but you do have life experiences. Share details about your internships and volunteering activities. Employers are excited to see such experiences in a resume. They prove a candidate is a well-rounded person with interests and commitment.

  1. Meet as Many People as Possible

Tell everyone you just graduated and you’re open for opportunities. Show people you want to work and the opportunities will come to you.

  1. Nail the Cover Letter!

Where do you show your enthusiasm? The cover letter gives you that chance! Unlike the resume, it’s written in first person. It allows you to include details that don’t fit in the resume. Write about your interests and show your enthusiasm to work for this particular company.

Useful Tools for Career Search

You don’t know where to start searching for a job? Here are few tools for you to check out:

  • LinkedIn – If you still don’t have a profile, do it now! Start making connections. You can use the platform to search for open positions.
  • Indeed – A classic job search engine that leads you to localized results.
  • CareerBuilder – Craft a great resume and upload it. The platform will pair you with the right opportunities.

You’re at a turning point in your life. You’ll be under a lot of stress to get that first job, but don’t lose your enthusiasm. It’s exactly what makes you attractive to employers.

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Chris Richardson!!****

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About: Chris Richardson is a journalist and editor at EssayGeeks.co.uk. He is fond of traveling, sports, and playing the guitar. Chris finds his inspiration in writing. Meet him on on Facebook and Google+.

 





The Do’s & Don’t’s of Presenting

16 05 2017

The presentation is a procedure where you represent your product or project in a speech, lecture or demonstration in order to educate your audience. For some, the anxiety level is high when you hear about giving presentations in front of people while some find it an easy calling. In other words, some freak out and some don’t! Before heading for a presentation, it’s important to loosen your nerves. Take a deep breath and begin. Concentrate on a specific object in the room to help you release your stress.

As a presenter, you have to be fully immersed in the topic in order to captivate the audience. Audience satisfaction is the goal of the presentation’s success. There’s a saying (some call it the “global rule” that the first impression is the last impression. Keep your presentation interactive and communicate with proper eye contact.

As you get started, here are some do’s and don’t’s on presenting, created by Walkerstone.

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3 Steps Towards a Perfect Resume

9 05 2017

Job hunting can be extraordinarily exhausting. It can be especially taxing when you feel like you’re not getting much response. Submitting your resume to dozens of employers week after week can feel like you’re fishing without a hook. However, one of the most effective things you can do to get a bite from potential employers is to spruce up your resume and cover letter. Let’s take a look at exactly what it takes to get the sparkling resume you’ve been dreaming of.

3 steps to a perfect resume

Cover Letter

Cover letters are truly commonplace in the job-seeking world these days. As such, it’s important to make sure that yours stands out. Essentially, what you want in a cover letter is a little bit more detail about who you are, what experience you have, and why you’re a great candidate.

Since this page should go before your resume, it is a first look into what type of employee you are and what professional experience you have. As a result, it can be quite easy to go overboard and provide the recruiter with too much information or irrelevant information. To avoid this, keep a few things in mind while writing your letter.

Keep your cover letter at a page long if you can. All of your job history, schooling, and references should be included in your resume, so you don’t have to go into detail about those topics in your cover letter. This is a great opportunity to tell your employer just a little bit about yourself. You might have some hidden talents that you practice as hobbies or you might want to explain your career goals or just expand on some awesome opportunities you’ve been able to be a part of in the past. Just make sure that you keep it short, concise, and to the point. If it doesn’t have a direct correlation with the potential employer hiring you, it doesn’t need to be in your cover letter.

References & Recommendations

Asking someone to be a reference or offer their personal recommendation for you as a spectacular employee is a tricky business. However, there is definitely a right and wrong way to do it. Namely, who you choose and why you choose them. Just because your good friend will say good things about you doesn’t necessarily mean you should put them on your resume.

Try to choose a reference that has worked with you in some sort of professional capacity. Ideal candidates for this task would be previous/current managers, teachers/professors, or other professional mentors. Let’s put it this way, putting down your parents or best friend from elementary school can come across as a bit childish. There are people in your life that know you have done great things and will go on to accomplish much more. It’s okay to let someone brag about you.

In addition, you shouldn’t need too many references. A good middle ground is about three references and/or recommendations. Unless they are going to list particularly amazing accomplishments of yours, I wouldn’t go above five. That just creates more work and research for your potential employer. Lastly, choose people that don’t all know you in the same way. For example, choosing three managers from the same job is not the way to go. Choosing one teacher, one manager, and one volunteer manager would be a great setup. They will all have unique things to say about their experience with you.

Once you decide on the best people for the job, you really need to make sure you have their permission before you let people give them a call or assume that they will explicitly recommend you for a position. Get in contact with that person and ask for the recommendation based on your previous professional interaction. Keep the request short and sweet. If they get back to you in a timely manner (probably a couple of days) then they are a good reference and will be responsive when potential employers give them a call. If they don’t respond or take too long, thank them for their time and move on.

Design

There are tons of fancy templates available on the web, but don’t be coaxed by all the frills you see on the page. Remember, your potential employer is probably looking at tons of these every single day. Keeping the page as de-cluttered and sleek as possible is the best plan of action.

Stick with simple black font on a white page. Obnoxious colors and themes are sure to turn off recruiters quickly. This doesn’t mean that you have to stick to New Times Roman size 10 or anything like that. There are plenty of downloadable fonts that look crisp, but also modern instead of dated and tacky. Try out a few before you decide on just one.

Your resume is simply to list your accomplishments. Again, try to make yours look as clean as possible. If you have additional information that you think is crucial for the recruiter to read, put it in the cover letter. Try not to expand too much on job details, personal reasons for starting or leaving school or a job etc. If there is information that the potential employer is curious about, it can be discussed in the interview. Although, you should feel confident that they have all the necessary professional information right in front of them already.

Creating the perfect resume takes years of experience. Don’t get discouraged if you feel like you have to make changes from time to time. As you grow in life and professionally, so will your ability to market yourself effectively to potential employers. It’s okay to ask for help from time to time. Co-workers and mentors can usually give you some insight into what a great resume looks like. However, take pride in your own style, accomplishments, and creativity. Making your resume your own is exactly what will attract the perfect employer. Good luck!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Trisha Miller!!****