And the Hits Keep On Comin’…

10 02 2016

photo-1429962714451-bb934ecdc4ec

February 10, 2016. This date might not have much significance to you, but it has great meaning to me. You see, today is my official blogging anniversary. Six years ago, I decided to take a hobby and shape into what you know as Campus to Career. I was sitting in the airport, bound for Singapore to participate in Enactus World Cup (then known as SIFE), an event that brought together real-life world-changers from over 40 countries. I figured it was time to get serious about this or give up altogether. I’m glad I got serious.

I’ve been fortunate to share my point of view on career advice, collaborate with some of the best in the business, and help young people succeed in their careers all over the world. Campus to Career has made several “top career advice” lists and we’ve been humbled by each and every one.

But, here’s the thing: NONE of this would have happened without YOUR support. Seriously. YOU make this little career advice blog such an incredible source of information. There are some particular individuals I’d like to call out with a personal thank you. They are:

Family – Mom, dad, siblings, cousins, my amazing wife…THANK YOU. I wouldn’t be the person I am today without your support, influence and swift kick in the butt from time to time!

Friends – I’m happy to say that there are simply too many to name here, but again, THANK YOU. Your support has meant the world to me.

Teachers – From my kindergarten teacher to my speech & debate coach to a few very special college professors…thanks for helping me find my way.

Mentors – Can I just say all of the above? Whether they’ve been official mentors or unofficial, they’ve been instrumental in my success, guiding me, listening, and offering perspective – in my career and in life.

Peers – Thank you for leading by example. There are millions of career advice experts, bloggers and “gurus” out there. I’ve been very fortunate to connect with many of you over the years and not only is Campus to Career stronger and better because of it, I’m a better person thanks to your openness and support to help make this world a better place. Many of the “hits” mentioned in the title of this post are because we collaborated to provide unique content to Campus to Career readers! (Thank you.)

Hits like these:

Here’s to 6 awesome years of partnership. I’m looking forward to many more!

COMING SOON: A new Campus to Career website design! We’re looking for volunteers to help us design a new logo. Interested? Email your pitch and sample to kirk.baumann@att.net. If selected, we’ll credit you for the work when the new site launches!

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12 Top Career & Leadership Experts to Follow in 2016

7 01 2016

c2c 2016Happy New Year!  For me, 2015 got off to a rocky start, but all in all, it was a good year.  Want to make 2016 an awesome year?  Twitter and LinkedIn are amazing resources for personal and professional development.  As a job seeker or someone who simply wants to improve themselves, the right influencers provide excellent advice, insight, best practices, inspiration and motivation to help you achieve your goals. This started out as a top ten list, but I couldn’t leave it at just ten resources.

So, I present to you:

Campus to Career’s 12 Top Career & Leadership Experts to Follow in 2016 (in alpha order):

Brittany Hodak (@BrittanyHodak) Brittany and I go way back…all the way to our humble beginnings in SmallTown, Oklahoma. Okay, that isn’t actually the name of the town (it’s Roland) but you get my point. Brittany is one of the most driven, passionate and gutsy people I know and her career success is a true reflection of her tenacity. She’s the Co-Founder of ZinePak,  blogs for Forbes, has been named to Ad Age’s 40 Under 40 list, and she even swims with sharks.

Doug Conant (@dougconant) You might recognize the name. Doug has been one of my unofficial mentors throughout my career. He’s is one of the most inspirational business professionals I’ve ever met. Oh, and he’s also the former CEO of Campbell Soup Company, leading with head, heart and hands. Read his book, TouchPoints.  I guarantee that you’ll find some excellent tips on how to be a better leader. Doug writes for LinkedIn as an Influencer regularly. Check out his posts here. He wrote a fantastic post recently on his site regarding 2016 Leadership Resolutions. Highly recommended.

Ed Han (@ed_han) Ed shares great content to help you succeed in your career. Personally, I enjoy his LinkedIn #tipoftheday. Ed contributes to Job-Hunt.org, considers himself a job seeker ally and provides good value to your Twitter stream.

Hannah Morgan (@careersherpa) She’s the guide for lifetime career navigation.  I love how Hannah shares so much of her own content, while complementing it with great articles and nuggets from other experts.  It’s the humble gesture that counts!

Jacob Share (@jacobshare) Jacob is a job search expert, professional blogger, creative thinker, and community builder with a sense of humor. He likes to help people. I like that. One of the ways he does that is by compiling incredible one-stop lists like the Top Job Search Articles of 2015 and 1500 Hot Twitter Job Search Feeds. Check ’em out.

Jeff Haden (@jeff_haden)  This guy is awesome.  As a LinkedIn Influencer, he’s providing some amazing advice in ways that we can relate to everyday life.  His posts are fun and very meaningful.  Check him out here.

Meghan Biro (@MeghanMBiro) She’s Founder & CEO of @TalentCulture, Host of #TChat (Wednesdays  7-8pm ET) and a regular contributor to Forbes.  Meghan is always sharing great information and like many on this list, she keeps social media social.  Follow her and tweet hello!

Rich Grant (@RichCareer) Rich is co-host of #CareerServChat, the popular Twitter forum for Career Services professionals.  He has some great articles on his blog and pays it forward, sharing useful content from other experts.

Sarah Landrum (@SarahLandrum) If the name sounds familiar, it may be because Sarah is a featured writer here at Campus to Career. Her articles are fantastic and bring a unique perspective to our readers. Adding her to our small team was one of the best things we did in 2015! Check out Sarah’s 6 Tips on Getting More From LinkedIn. She’s also the Founder of Punched Clocks. You can learn more about Sarah in this fun interview.

Steve Browne (@sbrownehr) Steve is a self-professed HR radical putting the human touch back into Human Resources. This guy GETS IT. Not only is he super-social (go ahead, tweet him), he’s one of the most inclusive, thoughtful people I’ve ever interacted with in my career. He also blogs at Everyday People, managing to find the extraordinary in everyone.

Steve Levy (@levyrecruits) He keeps it real, holding nothing back.  He’s a regular contributor to chats like #InternPro and #jobhuntchat.  Follow him for some of the best, frank career advice you’ve ever received.

YouTern (@YouTern)  Check out the blog, The Savvy Intern, for TONS of great articles to help you succeed.  YouTern and Campus to Career have partnered to bring you the best of both worlds. Look for more good stuff in 2016. BONUS: Follow Mark Babbitt and Dave Ellis.

Me (@kbaumann) (I know…seems selfish…we’ll call it “enlightened self-interest). I’d be honored if you followed me and liked Campus to Career on Facebook.  Research has proven that it’s silly to expect results if you don’t make the request.  So, I’m asking!  Let’s make 2016 awesome together.

There it is, folks.  Campus to Career’s 12 Top Career & Leadership Experts to Follow in 2016.  Well, technically…13. 🙂 When you follow them, take a look at who they follow and interact with.  This list wasn’t a top 100 for a reason.  You know who you want to follow and each person has unique needs and preferences.  Each person on this list is full of knowledge, shares that knowledge with the world and has a mission of helping others succeed.  That’s what we’re all about here at Campus to Career.

That being said….if you could add TWO people to the list, who would it be??  Please leave your recommendations (along with their Twitter username) in the comments below!  As always, thanks for reading.  Best wishes in 2016!

Like posts like this?  Click the “subscribe” button at the top right of your screen to get at least 51 more posts like this throughout the year.  They’re delivered directly to your inbox!





4 Reasons Recruiters May Consider You Unemployable

20 02 2014

most-unemployable-majors%20Over the past few weeks, I’ve talked to over 100 college students about their careers. Most of them – despite a slightly better economy and for reasons we all understand – remain scared to death about their pending entrance into the workforce.

During these conversations, it became clear that the anxiety isn’t because they’re afraid to enter “the real world” …but aren’t prepared, yet, to enter the workforce. They simply lack the mindset necessary to make the leap from graduate to professional.

Here are the top four reasons why recruiters may perceive you as unemployable – and how, by deliberately focusing on each, you can turn these barriers into assets:

1. Confidence is King

“I am way more qualified than my peers. And smarter. But they have job offers, and I don’t. Why?” (said sheepishly with little or no eye contact and with slumped shoulders).

Recruiters have always been reluctant to hire those who fail to exude confidence; since the beginning of time recruiters have been measured by their ability to hire leaders and difference-makers. For candidates in our new economy, any failure to show sincere self-assurance – and the desire to compete at a high level – is death to their application.

The good news: you have the rest of your college career to gain the experience and prepare the skills necessary to overcome this issue.

Start now. Develop a dynamic, affable, confident job search style. Or, regardless of your talent or smarts, keep wondering why you are always the last kid picked for kickball at recess.

2. The Best Strategy is Rarely the Easiest

“I’ve submitted 275 applications on http://www.BigJobBoard.com… and haven’t received a single call-back.”

After hearing this same story over and over again for almost five years now… why do we still think this approach is an effective job search strategy?

Here’s my theory:

  1. Job boards are easy
  2. Networking (especially for us introverts) and research are hard work
  3. Human nature dictates we try “easy” first – no matter how ineffective and frustrating the end result

Ask millions of your unemployed or underemployed friends: easy doesn’t work.

3. The “Catch-22”

“I’m only a college student – but employers want me to have all this experience. But if no one will hire me, how do I get the experience.”

Bunk.

With no internships or volunteer positions on your resume – and without the development of soft skills through campus activities, clubs, fraternities or sororities, and much more – of course many recruiters looking for a “can do the job, right now” candidate – are going to pass you over. Even those with a 4.0 GPA counting on their academic excellence to carry them into the workforce are likely to soon face a cold hard fact: in many industries, your job seeking competition with a 3.1 GPA – the confident networkers with significant hands-on experience and abundant soft skills – is going to kick your butt in the real world.

Simply put, there is No Excuse for No Experience.

4. Failure to Learn

“I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. I can’t get a job offer.”

I DO know what you are doing wrong… you are not making enough effort to learn what you’re doing wrong!

Every draft of a wholly customized cover letter and resume, every application, every phone/Skype interview and every single face-to-face meeting is a golden chance to discover what worked very well, what part of the process you can improve a bit – and perhaps what went horribly wrong.

Self-analyze your job search strengths and weaknesses. Discuss the process with a mentor. Ask for feedback from the recruiters you meet during your job search and while networking. Otherwise, you’ve just wasted a golden opportunity to learn – and improve.

Are any of these four barriers of entry stopping you from being seen as ready-to-be-hired?

More important: between now and graduation, how will you make yourself more employable?

***For this fantastic post, Campus to Career thanks Mark Babbitt and the folks at YouTern!***

MarkAbout the Author: CEO and Founder of YouTern, Mark Babbitt is a serial mentor who has been quoted in the Wall Street Journal, Mashable, Forbes and Under30CEO.com regarding job search, career development, internships and higher education’s role in preparing emerging talent for the workforce. A keynote speaker and blogger, Mark’s contributions include Huffington Post, Bloomberg News, Switch and Shift, and Under30CEO.

Mark has been honored to be named to GenJuice’s list of “Top 100 Most Desirable Mentors,” HR Examiner’s “Top 25 Trendspotters in HR” and CareerBliss’ “Top 10 Gen Y Career Experts.” Mark is currently working on two new books: “A World Gone Social: How Business Must Adapt to Survive (AMACOM, June 2014) with Ted Coine and “The Ultimate Guide to Internships (And Making Your College Years Matter Again)” (Allworth, September 2014). Contact Mark via email or on Twitter!





14 People to Follow in 2014

31 12 2013

2014Happy New Year!  2013 had its ups and downs, but all in all, it was a good year.  Want to make 2014 an awesome year?  Twitter and LinkedIn are amazing resources for personal and professional development.  As a job seeker or someone who simply wants to improve themselves, the right influencers provide excellent advice, insight, best practices, inspiration and motivation to help you achieve your goals. So, to help you get started, here is Campus to Career’s 14 People to Follow in 2014 (in alpha order):

CareerBliss (@CareerBliss) CareerBliss made the 2013 list, but I still love this blog.  It makes me happy. Even their logo makes me happy. CareerBliss provides relevant, always fun to read posts that will help you advance in your career. Check them out on Pinterest as well!

Doug Conant (@dougconant) Doug is one of the most inspirational business professionals I’ve ever met. He’s the former CEO of Campbell Soup Company, leading with head, heart and hands. Read his book, TouchPoints.  I guarantee that you’ll find some excellent tips on how to be a better leader. Doug recently joined LinkedIn as an Influencer as well. Check out his posts here.

Hannah Morgan (@careersherpa) She’s the guide for lifetime career navigation.  I love how Hannah shares so much of her own content, while complementing it with great articles and nuggets from other experts.  It’s the humble gesture that counts!

Jeff Haden (@jeff_haden)  This guy is awesome.  As a LinkedIn Influencer, he’s providing some amazing advice in ways that we can relate to everyday life.  His posts are fun and very meaningful.  Check him out here.

Jennie Mustafa-Julock (@CoachJennie)  She has a great blog and I love her bio.  She doesn’t subscribe to the gentle encouragement coaching thing.  I’ve found her advice to be the kick in the pants we all need sometimes!

Jenny Blake (@jenny_blake) She’s an author, but keep reading…I’m not selling anything.  Jenny truly wants you to grow as a professional.  She’s pretty dang good at it, too.  Check out her website, jennyblake.me.  The site is fantastic and has a TON of resources available to you.  I also love her bio.  J

John Muscarello (@jmmuscarello) Check out his blog, Start Networking Today, for some excellent tips to get you going in the right direction.  John is a regularly participant of the weekly Twitter chat, #InternPro (where we started the conversation.)   He truly keeps social media social!

Keppie Careers (@Keppie_Careers) Miriam Salpeter’s blog, Keppie Careers, is one of the first that I followed as I entered into the digital space as a career blogger.  It made the 2013 list and remains to be a must follow!

Meghan Biro (@MeghanMBiro) She’s Founder & CEO of @TalentCulture, Host of #TChat (Wednesdays  7-8pm ET) and a regular contributor to Forbes.  Meghan is always sharing great information and like many on this list, she keeps social media social.  Follow her and tweet hello!

Me (@kbaumann) (I know…seems selfish) but I’d be honored if you followed me and liked Campus to Career on Facebook.  Research has proven that it’s silly to expect results if you don’t make the request.  So, I’m asking!  Let’s make 2014 awesome together.

Rich Grant (@RichCareer) Rich is co-host of #CareerServChat, the popular Twitter forum for Career Services professionals.  He has some great articles on his blog and pays it forward, sharing useful content from other experts.

Ritika Trikha (@RitikaTrikha) Ritika writes for @CareerBliss.  She’s the author behind many creative articles such as What Makes a LinkedIn Bio Great?  plus many more fantastic reads.

Steve Levy (@levyrecruits) He keeps it real, holding nothing back.  He’s a regular contributor to chats like #InternPro and #jobhuntchat.  Follow him for some of the best, frank career advice you’ve ever received.

YouTern (@YouTern)  Check out the blog, The Savvy Intern, for TONS of great articles to help you succeed.  YouTern and Campus to Career partnered to bring you the best of both worlds in 2013. 2014 will be, as Barney Stinson put it, LEGEN-(wait for it)-DARY!  I’d like to thank Mark Babbitt and Dave Ellis for all their hard work.  Keep it up, guys!

There it is, folks.  Campus to Career’s 14 People to Follow in 2014.  When you follow them, take a look at who they follow and interact with.  This list wasn’t a top 100 for a reason.  You know who you want to follow and each person has unique needs and preferences.  Each person on this list is full of knowledge, shares that knowledge with the world and has a mission of helping others succeed.  That’s what we’re all about here at Campus to Career.

That being said….if you could add TWO people to the list, who would it be??  Please leave your recommendations (along with their Twitter username) in the comments below!  As always, thanks for reading.  Best wishes in 2014!

Like posts like this?  Click the “subscribe” button at the top right of your screen to get at least 51 more posts like this throughout the year.  They’re delivered directly to your inbox!





The 3 “P’s” to Interview Like a Pro

10 09 2013

interview-success-300x198Are you ready to interview? Ready to compete? The time to get in the right mindset… is now.

To make the most out of every job interview opportunity, and jump way ahead of the competition, consider delivering the three “P” statements: Purpose, Preparation and Polish!

Purpose

Dress the part; set your shoulders back; extend a firm handshake; and state your purpose:

“My name is Thomas Smith, I am here for the 10:00 interview… and to secure the Social Media internship.”

Nine times out of ten, your Purpose statement will not only get you a warmer welcome, you’ll immediately set a positive tone for the entire interview.

Preparation

Duly impressed, the recruiter will begin their locked-in interview process. “Tell me about you?” followed by “What is your greatest weakness?” or something similar. Eventually, they will get to “Do you have any questions for me?” When they do (or preferably even before they do) deliver your Preparation statement:

“I do have some questions about the company and my role, please…”

For dramatic effect, take out your professional notepad that contains your list of prepared questions… the kind of questions not found in the annual report or on Google – something real. An example: “What do you enjoy most about working here?”

And whatever you do, don’t turn your Preparation statement into a question about you! At this point, “What are my chances of being offered a full-time job with this company” will be perceived as self-indulgent – and cripple the momentum of the interview.

Polish

This is my favorite… because it wins more interviews than anything else you can do or say. At the appropriate moment, state:

“I’ve taken the liberty to…”

For instance:

  • “I’ve taken the liberty to… draft a social media strategy we can execute”
  • “I’ve taken the liberty to… construct an analysis of our competitor’s strengths and weaknesses.”

No matter how you finish the Polish statement – you’ll be talking as if you mentally already have the job, show you’re not afraid to start the work without prompting and are the right person for the job.

Bonus Tip!

In each of the statements and examples above you’ll notice that not one of them contain the words “you”, “your” or “they”. Instead, we use inclusive words to state our intentions: “our” (“…our competitors…”), “we” (“…we can execute…”) and even “my” (“…my role…). This little change in your approach implies you already belong there, are already thinking like a member of the team – and make a HUGE difference in the mindset of a recruiter fatigued by “blah, blah, blah” answers.

Use your Purpose, Preparation and Polish statements (the “3Ps”) and move your job or internship search dramatically forward!

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For this post, Campus to Career thanks our friends at YouTern!

mark-babbittAbout the author:  A passionate supporter of Gen Y talent, YouTern CEO Mark Babbitt is a serial entrepreneur and mentor. Mark has been quoted in Forbes, Fortune, Mashable, ReadWriteWeb, and Under30CEO.com regarding internships, emerging talent and the current job market – and was recently honored to be named to GenJuice’s “Top 100 Most Desirable Mentors” list.





No Job Offers? Maybe You’re Scaring Recruiters Away

20 08 2013

worker-scared-networkingIt seems that many in the ranks of the unemployed… are unemployed for a reason.

One of three reasons, to be exact.

Their failure to find work is often because they fall into one of three job seeker personality types: the Ego, the Victim and the Stalker… each of which scare away hiring managers and recruiters – and drive them toward safer candidates that will fit better within their culture.

Thankfully, with a modest effort, these job seeker types can change:

The Ego

The Ego personality is typically a person who writes checks his resume can’t cash.

The Ego may come from a very good school… but have no real experience. Maybe they’ve been so propped up by their helicopter parents that the idea of “entry-level” doesn’t work for them.

Perhaps they’re a workforce veteran that has been downsized after climbing the ranks of management and now just can’t deal with the thought of sliding backward. Maybe they obtained a certain status within their industry and developed an elitist attitude (along with high demands from employers).

For certain, the “Ego” doesn’t seem to realize their vision of themselves, and where they should be, was an economic lifetime ago – and they can’t let go.

If you are an Ego job seeker personality type:

Take a step back. Apply a more humanistic approach to your job search, and a certain degree of humility, by volunteering within your community. By working selflessly with others, you’ll regain a sense of balance – and will then be able to focus on what is important to you, including a sense of contribution (rather than letting your view of what you should be, define you).

The Victim

Almost the polar opposite of the Ego, is the Victim. He can’t find a job, has little confidence – and tells the world that his situation is not his fault.

The typical Victim has built a fortress around himself. He’s submitted dozens, perhaps hundreds, of online applications and perhaps has been on several interviews. That effort hasn’t resulted in a single job offer, however. So, despite continuing to actively job search, he has no expectation of receiving an offer anytime soon.

The most telling sign of a Victim: he blames everyone and everything else for his current situation – the economy, his city, his old boss or company, maybe even his spouse or family.

If you are a Victim job seeker personality type:

Try something different! Take your job search in a different direction. Recognize that what you’ve been doing is not working. Also realize that no one wants to hire someone who constantly complains, makes excuses and blames others. Instead, they want someone who will fit their company culture and add to a pleasant, positive working environment.

Network more. Blog. Join the career-related chats on Twitter. Enlist the services of a professional career counselor or coach. And until you find some self-confidence… celebrate every little victory: a new lead, speaking to an influential contact, a new internship – anything to help you get out of victim mode.

The Stalker

The Stalker is one who is so eager (read: desperate) that she leaves all common sense behind.

She applies for the same job 16 times in three weeks. And/or after the interview… calls, emails and tweets so often she either scares, or annoys the hell out of, the recruiter. Through her actions, and perhaps despite the perfect resume and work experience, she comes off more like Glenn Close in ‘Fatal Attraction’ than she does the perfect team member. The Stalker rarely gets a first chance, and never gets a second.

No one wants to hire a stalker.

If you are a Stalker job seeker personality type:

Relax and resist. By “relax” I mean STOP letting your desperation show. And by “resist” I mean you must resist all temptation to turn into an overbearing, relentless candidate whom no one wants to hire. For a detailed “how-to” on effective (non-stalker) communication with a recruiter, see “Job Seekers: No One Ever Hires…a Stalker“.

With so many candidates competing with you for that dream job, be sure you don’t become a recruiter’s worst nightmare: the Ego, the Victim or the Stalker. If your job search is stalled, thoroughly review these three personality types and evaluate yourself honestly: do you fit into one of these categories?

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For this post, Campus to Career thanks our friends at YouTern!  Check out their blog, The Savvy Intern, for some really great career tips. (Psst! They’re also one of our 13 Super Experts to Follow on Twitter in 2013…just sayin’.)

mark-babbitt

About the author:  A passionate supporter of Gen Y talent, YouTern CEO Mark Babbitt is a serial entrepreneur and mentor. Mark has been quoted in Forbes, Fortune, Mashable, ReadWriteWeb, and Under30CEO.com regarding internships, emerging talent and the current job market – and was recently honored to be named to GenJuice’s “Top 100 Most Desirable Mentors” list.





How to Bomb Your Job Interview (in 10 Minutes or Less)

23 07 2013

 

Bomb-cool-vector-material2So you don’t get called back after what you thought were “great” job interviews? And it happens more than a couple times?

From pre-interview all the way to follow-up, chances are very good you need to make a few adjustments. Quickly.

Pre-Interview

Go Casual: You have this interview in the bag- who cares if you’re wearing jeans and a hoodie! You’re Gen Y! Zuckerberg doesn’t wear suits!

“Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence in society.”  – Mark Twain

I’m not suggesting you show up to your interview naked (although that would certainly end your interviewing excursion. Mission accomplished!) Ask the recruiter ahead of time, on the phone or email, about the company dress code. If asking is uncomfortable for you, play it safe with dress pants or slacks and a nice shirt and tie; or skirt and blouse. Even at a “laid back” start-up would be impressed with your professionalism.

Better to be over dressed than…well, naked.

Arrive Unprepared: You emailed your resume – certainly the hiring manager had time to memorize it, or at least to print it and bring copies with him. Right?

Bring copies of your resume to the interview. And having a quality notebook or leather-bound portfolio in which to take interview notes will add to the impression that you’re a professional. The more you know about the company and industry before the interview, the better. Do your research to learn the company’s history, major competitors, market niche, products, etc.

The Interview

Minute One:  The Weak Handshake

This is a time-honored first impression killer. The interviewer enters the room. They greet you warmly, smiling, and extend their hand to grasp yours…this can be an awkward moment if you over-think it. Will your hands meet correctly? Will they land slightly askew, resulting in that quasi-handshake, half high-five event?

Use a firm handshake to indicate confidence and potential strength of character.  And definitely make solid eye contact with the interviewer! That will display some competence and social ability.

Minute Two: Your Cell Phone Rings (ideally to a Ke$ha ringtone)

This is an easy one to forget since most of us are so completely tied to this little electronic second brain. Turn your phone off (completely off!) before the interview.  If you forget and it does ring, DO NOT answer it, or even consider sending a quick text while the interviewer’s head is turned. (Yes… people actually do this…)

This is more inappropriate and annoying than couples who hold hands at the gym! The hiring manager will definitely notice your lack of social etiquette.

Minute Three to Seven: Your Eyes Glaze Over, Your Shoulders Hunch, You Yawn…

Your body language communicates loudly. Maintain eye contact with your interviewer. Sit forward- it shows active interest with your full body. Nod your head at appropriate times and ask questions throughout the interview. An interview should be a two-way conversation.

Give your interviewer time to explain the opening and the company culture, but jump in with quality questions. By “quality questions” I don’t mean: “How long is lunch in this office?” or “I have a vacation with my boyfriend coming up soon. Is that ok?”

Minute Eight: Show Me The Money!

You’re just starting out in your career – you’ve already earned a big salary! You should bring that up right away, right? Wrong.

Discuss the position first and foremost. Sure, being paid for your time and skills is how capitalism works! But focus on the job details first- discuss compensation afterward, once you and the recruiter agree that you’re the right fit.

Before the interview, research your industry’s salary rates and the cost of living for the area.  You’ll be prepared to negotiate a salary that will cover your living expenses and enable you to set aside savings for emergencies. Having a job is only great when you can afford to pay your bills. Being underemployed is just as hard as being unemployed.

Minute Nine and Ten: Be Really Un-Friendly

With the exception of very technical positions, employers interview for skills, but they hire forpersonality. Most entry level skills can be learned through on the job training. The interview reveals if you will be a good fit with the manager and their team. (I once got a job where the interviewer was a big golf nut. I play golf, so we talked about golf the entire interview).

Don’t use polite manners, smile or have an engaging and articulate conversation with the interviewer – avoid these as they will most certainly encourage the hiring manager to consider you further.

Post- Interview: The Follow Up

Your best chance of not being hired is to blend in with the tens, or sometimes hundreds of other applicants… like job seeking camouflage! Don’t fall into the forgotten pile- send a follow up letter after the interview; at the very least an email to thank the interviewer for their time and add a few memorable points from your discussion (maybe even a question or two that you thought of after the interview). Better yet, send an old-school hand-written letter.

Most interviewees send resumes and wait… or interview and hope. If you don’t want to get hired… don’t stand out.

Now that you’ve read the list, did anything seem familiar? If so, start making some changes. Now would be good.

Special thanks to our friends at YouTern for this great post

 

Dave_AuthorAbout the Author: Dave Ellis is an original member of the YouTern team and is instrumental to its success… in fact, he’s so awesome there wouldn’t be a YouTern without him (and he might have written this bio himself). Dave serves as YouTern’s Content and Community Manager, and enjoys his role as the company’s “Man Behind the Curtain”. In his spare time, Dave volunteers, rescuing and rehabilitating sea lions and baby elephant seals. Connect with Dave on LinkedIn and follow him on Twitter!