How Social Accounts Can Impact Your Candidacy

1 02 2017

 

Did you share that super-fun, albeit slightly embarrassing story about your wild Friday night on Facebook? How about express a moderately insensitive political viewpoint on a short but pointed tweet? If you’re thinking about a prospective job, you might want to reconsider damaging posts, tags, or rants.

That’s because prospective employers don’t just sit back and let your resume speak for itself. They’re looking at all sorts of information, from references you provide to information you don’t even know you’ve given them—your social media accounts. What’s the risk, and what should you do about it? The information in this graphic helps you make a good assessment.

Additional resources:

How Your Social Accounts Can Impact Your Candidacy

Via AkkenCloud





Why Skills Matter More Than Your Degree

19 01 2017

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When applying for a job, hiring managers are going to look at your education to determine whether or not they feel you are qualified for the job. But your degree and education are not the only important factors when considering if you fit the job needs.

The skills and experiences you have are sometimes more important than your education. In many ways, having the right set of skills will be more beneficial than having the right degree.

But why are your skills so important when applying to a job?

Skills Better Show Your Personality, Values and Goals

While your degree can show you are educated and a hard worker, it doesn’t tell much about you as a person. Your degree can show you’re capable of completing the job tasks, but it doesn’t tell how well you will fulfill the other necessities of the position.

In order to be successful in a job, you need to have communication skills, time management skills, and teamwork and leadership skills. If you’re unable to work as a team, communicate with your coworkers, and properly manage your tasks, your education won’t matter.

A Degree May Get You the Job, But Skills Help You Advance

Your entry-level positon is rarely the job you hope to be in until retirement. While having the right degree and the right education may land you the entry-level position you need to enter the workforce, without necessary skills you won’t move beyond into higher roles and responsibilities.

If you want to continue to receive promotions and be handed bigger and better projects, you need to show you have the skills employers are looking for in long-term employees. Continue to develop your skills even after you’ve been hired into your initial position.

Skills Show Experiences Education Can’t

When you’re ready to enter into the workforce, you’ve had years and years of experiences and challenges behind you that do not relate to your degree. Through part-time jobs you’ve held, internships you’ve participated in, or even military experience, you’ve developed skills, habits and behaviors your degree cannot represent.

If you didn’t have a traditional education or feel your skills better reflect what you can contribute to the position, you may want to consider applying to a job using a different kind of resume. By highlighting your skills instead of your education, you’re putting what you feel to be most important at the forefront of the hiring manager’s mind.

Having a Degree is Important the Focus of the Degree is Not

When you go to get a degree, the field of your degree is becoming less and less important. As jobs become more fluid and majors become more specific, it isn’t always clear where a degree lines up in the workforce. But this isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

A degree tells a hiring manager you are serious about continuing your education and you are able to follow a rigid course of classes and requirements to achieve a goal. Having a degree is typically a prerequisite for entering the workforce and getting a job, but the focus of your degree is becoming less and less important.

If you’re applying for your first “real” job, don’t stress too much about your degree. As long as you’ve received a quality education, you’re serious about the job you’re applying to, and you’re ready to work hard for the company that hires you, your major or field of focus won’t be the most important application factor. Instead, let your unique skills, values and perceptions land you the job of your dreams and fuel you through promotions and raises.

sarah landrum head shotAbout the author: Sarah Landrum is a graduate from Penn State with degrees in Marketing and PR. Now, she’s a freelance writer and career blogger sharing advice on navigating the work world and achieving happiness and success in your career. She’s also a member of the Campus to Career family, serving as a featured contributor on a regular basis. You can find her tweeting during boring speeches @SarahLandrum





10 Ways Top Candidates Set Themselves Apart

10 01 2017

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Let’s face it, if you were hired for a job based on your resume alone, there would be no need to interview. But because no one is hired solely as a result of their work experience and/or accomplishments, interviews are a necessary evil. The face-to-face meeting does, however, offer an opportunity to go beyond the resume and set yourself apart from other equally qualified candidates.

So, how do you leverage the interview to rise above the rest? It all comes down to communication. A recent study declared verbal communication the top skill employers value in recent college grads. Being well-spoken is the best way for candidates at every level, in every industry, to gain an edge over their competition.

Here are a few more specifics:

Make your excitement about the opportunity obvious

Companies want to hire people who are eager to work for them, so express enthusiasm while you’re answering interview questions. Oddly enough, candidates don’t always realize that they aren’t fully expressing their interest. More often than we want to admit, recruiters get the following feedback from clients, “I like this candidate but s/he didn’t really seem excited about the position.”  Ouch, that stings and is definitely hard to recover from. Put yourself in the hiring manager’s shoes. Wouldn’t you pick the candidate who showed more interest and excitement about the opportunity, assuming all the skills were there?

Don’t make the interviewer dig for answers

Solid candidates recognize what the interviewer is trying to uncover based on the line of questioning and respond accordingly. This means they don’t just say, “oh I have great organizational skills,” but they actually offer unprompted examples of how they organize their priorities and how their organizational skills positively impacted the outcome of a certain project.

Leave the generic responses at home

Great candidates usually have a unique point of view and thoughtful answers to questions asked. Don’t be afraid to gather your thoughts in front of the interviewer before responding to a question, rather than rushing to give the generic answer that the interviewer has probably heard a hundred times.

Convey flexibility

It’s wonderful to be committed to a five-year plan or to have clear, professional goal in mind. But you don’t want to come across as rigid, especially since your specific goals may limit you from opportunities and or direction that only become apparent with a new position.

Command the convo regarding your previous experience

When responding to questions, you are either in control of the answer, or the answer is like a runaway train. Candidates with excellent communication skills talk about their past experience in precise terms with specificity. Prior to an interview, brush up on the details of your work history and the progression of your career so that you can talk about any aspect with ease, and use it to your advantage when needed.

Hear what Atrium Recruiters have to say about standing out in a job interview.

Quantify your value

If you have numbers to back up your experience, use them. Whether it’s dollars saved or earned for a company, time-saving efficiencies you introduced or other quantifiable successes, be sure to articulate them during the interview process. #humblebrag

Show that you can take initiative

Effectively communicate that you’re they type of employee who takes initiative. Even at the entry-level, companies hire individuals who will evolve into leaders. Convey this during the interview by providing an example of a project where you self-started or went above and beyond.

Talk about being growth-oriented, without talking about future positions

Great candidates are able to express a desire to grow within a position for their own betterment and to add to their own skill set, not necessarily to climb the ranks. 

Be genuine in your delivery and comfortable in your own skin

An interview can put people on edge and make them tense. Although easier said than done, be yourself. It’s critical that you come across as genuine and authentic in order to build rapport with the interviewer. If you do this well, the interviewer will come away with an idea of what it would be like to have you on his/her team.

Keep the conversation fluid

Make the interview enjoyable for the interviewer! Ask questions that engage the interviewer and facilitate back and forth dialogue.

****For this fantastic post, Campus to Career thanks our friends at Atrium Staffing!!****





5 College Activities to Build Skills for Your Career

20 12 2016

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Making the move from college to starting your career can be an exciting or stressful time for fresh graduates, depending on their preparation, chosen field, and a whole host of factors that are outside anyone’s control. In a market where some are saying a bachelor’s degree is the new high school diploma in terms of the minimum requirement to get a job, smart college students are developing relevant skills to separate themselves from the pack.

Here are 5 activities you can do while in college that will help you develop valuable skills to boost your resume and improve your job prospects after graduation.

Join career path-related societies – If you have an idea of what you might like to do after you graduate, join a related society on campus. For example, if you want to be a paramedic, you could get involved with the campus emergency services while in college. Aside from learning and applying some of the real skills you may use later, you’ll also develop valuable contacts and networks that may serve you well later. There are societies or organizations in most universities covering the major areas of study, including law societies, engineering societies, and more.

Attend campus talks and networking events – Many talks will be organized by student societies or by the departments themselves, and they are great places to mingle with your peers, professors, and outsiders who attend. Get on the email lists of any department or society you are interested in to see what events are coming up.

Get involved in student government – This could be connected to the particular organization related to your area of study, or to student life at your college in general. Skills you can develop here include leadership, project and event management, and networking. If you have leadership or management aspirations, this is a good way to cut your teeth.

Check out local Meetups – Getting involved in activities off-campus is a great way to expand your network beyond your circle of peers and classmates. Sites like meetup.com hold meetups and networking events on everything under the sun. There are over 140,000 active groups worldwide, with the highest concentration of groups in the biggest cities. The main skill you’ll be developing at meetups is networking, though depending on the meetup you choose to go to, you could be learning and actively doing a wide variety of skills and activities.

Give back with community work – Giving back to the community looks great on a resume, and if you get involved with a cause that is important to you, it gives you something to talk passionately about in an interview. You can learn a wide variety of career skills, depending on the type of community work you choose, but will also develop valuable interpersonal skills like empathy and teamwork.

Editor’s note: Campus to Career recommends that you explore involvement with your local Enactus team. There are over 400 university campuses active in the Enactus United States network and 1,700+ worldwide.  Click here to learn more and find a team. 

The common theme in all of these is networking; if you find an area of interest or activity you are passionate about, the best thing you can do is get more involved and develop a related network. Success in the job hunt today is about a combination of who you know, what you know, and what kind of commitment you have to continued learning and development of new skills.

What other college activities have you found helpful in preparing you for your career? Share your ideas in the comments below!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Joel Curry!!****

About: Joel Curry is a Career Advisor and Resume Expert who writes for Resume Companion. He helps job seekers craft more compelling cover letters and resumes, and gives career advice to those pursuing leadership and management level positions.





5 Tips for Getting an Awesome Job at a Startup

6 12 2016

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So, you want to work for a startup? They can be exciting to work for, offer up tremendous learning opportunities, and really pay off if you’re working for the best ones.

But getting hired by the best can certainly be a challenge. This is partly because startups have bought into the old Steve Jobs “only hire A players” mentality. But they are also looking for a specific kind of talent.

I’ve both run and worked for startups for the last 10 years. I’ve hired for them and been hired. Here’s my advice for getting in the door.

1. Show them that you’ve got startup-like experience.

Having worked at a startup before will help you a lot in getting hired at a startup. But this of course can be a chicken and egg problem. If you don’t have startup experience, how do you get it?

First off, you don’t necessarily have to have worked at a startup. Look for any experiences you’ve had where expectations were high and supervision was low. Somewhere you got thrown in the deep end and had to sink or swim.

My most startup like-experience, before I actually worked at a startup, was at a restaurant. My first night working at a particular restaurant when I was young was supposed to be training.

But when one of the servers didn’t show, and the restaurant got packed, they asked me to just try waiting as many tables as I could. I had to figure it out as I went, make decisions in the absence of guidance, and do the best I could with what I had.

If you don’t have startup experience, see if you can tell them about a situation you were in that relates.

You can also show this in the way you apply. When I applied to work with Betterteam, part of my test for being hired was writing a long-form article. To make the article really stand out, I cold called and interviewed several influential people in our space, something no other candidate did.

2. Show a love for learning.

The only thing that doesn’t change at a startup is the constant changing. Your job won’t fit into the typical job description.

There’s a good chance that you’ll be doing something completely different on day 1, day 30 and day 90.

Successful startup founders know this, and they’ll be looking for people who can adapt, learn and grow with the startup. Of course, you don’t want to just tell them you’re willing to learn. Show them.

Do you study languages or play instruments in your spare time? Practice a martial art, or run a hobby website?

This is something I’ve seen among my colleagues that make it at startups – they all have multiple hobbies and skills that they’re at varying stages of developing.

3. Know where to look.

When startups post jobs, they don’t always do it on traditional job boards.

A lot of them like to use niche boards that are more likely to bring in the type of candidates they’re looking for. Here are a few you’ll want to check out.

  • Weworkremotely – as the name suggests, mostly focused on remote jobs.

  • AngelList – lots of startups post their jobs here, and many report having success with it.

  • Hacker News – lists jobs with Y Combinator startups.

  • Authentic Jobs – lists jobs for developers, designers and various other startup positions.

4. Know the tools.

When I hired at my startup, I always hated getting resumes sent to me as Word files. PDFs were a little better, but what really showed me that someone had the same sensibilities as our company was getting a Google Doc resume link sent.

I’m not saying you have to be in love with Google Docs, but it’s good to figure out what tools a startup uses, and show familiarity with them.

Other tools that are popular among startups include Slack, Basecamp, Calendly, Asana, Github, Skype and Google Hangouts.

I doubt anyone is going to pass on a great hire because they sent something as a Word doc, but using and knowing the same tools that they use is definitely a sign of cultural fit.

5. Be helpful.

Maybe you’re just not quite ready yet. You either don’t have experience that convinces someone you can function as a startup employee, or don’t have the right skills.

While you’re waiting, see if you can find a way to be helpful to the startups you’d most like to work for.

Automattic, the company responsible for WordPress.com, notes on their job page that if you’re looking to be one of their Happiness Engineers, you may have spent some time helping people out in their forums.

If you’re interested in working for a few particular startups, keep an eye on them with social media, and see if there are ways you can contribute outside the company before you come on, and get on their radar.

That’s what I’ve got! It’s a good time to be looking for startup jobs, skilled employees are hard to find in general, and the startup space is especially in need of great employees. Get out there and get that job!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Paul Peters!!****

pp1About: Paul Peters is content marketer and job ad writer with Betterteam. Before Betterteam he spent 6 years building an education startup, where he was was involved with many aspects of the business, including hiring and marketing. He lives in Whitefish, Montana.





5 Reasons to Opt for International Internships

27 09 2016

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International internships are both exhilarating and frightening, but when you get passed the fear, you will be faced with one-of-a-kind opportunity: A chance to build a career in a foreign company, or to build a good base for your future career opportunities. Not only is an internship abroad beneficial for standing out in the future of your career, it’s going to benefit you personally as well. If you’re still lingering on the edge of deciding, these 5 reasons will definitely push you over the brink and into international waters.

1.      Mingling with the Global Crowd

Networking is extremely important in any industry, in fact, businesses nowadays can’t sustain without connecting and collaborating. Internship abroad can enable you to get acquainted with professionals outside of your culture.

  • You’ll meet experts from various countries which will give you a chance to deeper knowledge of their business practice and knowledge.
  • You’ll make connections that will prove to be very valuable in the future of your career.
  • You’ll build a circle of mentors, friends and colleagues you can rely on throughout your career.

2.      Get the Competitive Edge

Finding a job in today’s business environment is very difficult, and statistics have shown that 50% of undergraduates aren’t employed. In order to get in the frontlines and appeal to employers, you’re going to need a competitive edge.

  • An international internship is going to give you the edge you need.
  • It will add weight to your resume, and make you different from other applicants striving to get the same job as you.
  • It will also give you better professional opportunities and boost your marketability.

3.      Dive into the World of Unknown

Once you step foot into foreign grounds, you’ll be subjected to a whole, new experience that can’t compare to what you’d experience in your own, familiar surroundings.

  • You will gain unique knowledge, skills and perspective. Anything unique is valuable to any business industry.
  • Developing your foreign language proficiency is a valuable asset for your career, as emphasis is being put on global communication in every industry.

4.      Raise Your Game to the Next Level

College gives you the opportunity to gain immense knowledge about the field of your interest, but an international internship will give you a peerless education, in terms of skills and knowledge. Traveling to help your career is one of the biggest steps to take in order to immensely improve your portfolio and become a desirable asset to companies around the globe.

  • You will develop your expertise and sharpen your skills, and make that transferable to other work opportunities.
  • Stepping out into the global arena will enable you to get insight into the mechanics of global business, giving you knowledge on exactly how you will build your business in the future.

5.      Become the Role-Model for Confidence

In a very competitive environment, one thing nobody wants to see is a dispirited, terrified undergraduate who lacks confidence, motivation and courage.

  • An internship abroad will personally benefit you, in terms of confidence. You’re going to be put in a new environment, with the necessity to become independent on your own. This will more than often require you to use your problem-solving skills to adapt to the newly found surroundings.
  • You’ll make your future pitches more successful and intriguing, due to the confidence and experience gained.

If you’re enthusiastic about overseas internships, keep on reading and check out a list of websites where you can find great internship offers.

Global Experiences

They enable students to take part in internships that are going to bring the not just valuable professional experience, but also enable them to immerse in the language and culture of another country. The entire team of creators have been a part of internships around the globe, so their programs are tailored to suit the needs of students and make the process of finding a program and actually hoping on plane much easier.

IASTE international exchange program

This is a great resource for students in the technical field. If you’re looking for overseas professional opportunities in the fields of architecture, science, engineering or maths, you can apply for one through their website. What’s great is that all students get stipends that cover their costs of living. The entire organization really goes out of their way to help you with administration, visa process and other aspects of traveling abroad.

Go Abroad

They enable you to find internships all around the world, but at the same time earn college credit. You can search internships based on your length of stay, specific destination, field of work, or even contact one of their advisors who can give you a list of specific internships you might be interested in. They will help you with just about any aspect of landing the internship and getting the right information.

World Internships

They have a list of existing internships available right now, and for more budget-friendly internships, they made sure to give you a placement only option, so you don’t have to pay for the accommodation just for the internship itself. All you have to do is find the ideal internship based on the preferred location, field of work and you’re good to go.

GoOverseas

Similar to Go Abroad, you can simply choose your field of work and desired destination and look through the existing programs and offers to find the one that’s best suitable for you. You can explore the programs listed, make your own wish list to bookmark your highlights for later consideration, connect with other travelers and exchange stories and experiences, as well as apply for a program through their website.

Every internship is a great challenge, and although getting out of your comfort zone doesn’t seem appealing at first, it’s the only way you’ll get a head start over all the other hungry candidates striving to get the same job you do.

rachel-barteeAuthor’s Bio: Rachel Bartee is a part-time writer at EduGeeksClub paper writing service who finds her passion in sharing insightful ideas as a blogger. She is constantly looking for the ways to improve her skills and expertise. Her life principle is “Always do more than you can”.





Boost the Skills Section of Your Resume [Infographic]

9 08 2016

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Are you a talented content marketer?

Or perhaps you’ve got killer sales skills?

Many candidates ignore their skills section, believing that recruiters focus more on other parts of their resumes. That’s a huge mistake. Your skill set is something you should expose to the world – it’s the foundation of your professional identity.

Consider this – recruiters spend  an average 6 seconds looking at a resume  before deciding whether it’s worth their time. Knowing what skills to put on a resume [https://uptowork.com/blog/what-skills-to-put-on-a-resume] is critical so that you can grab recruiters’ attention at this stage in the  process.  And you can do that with a well crafted skills section.

But first things first – how do you find out  what skills recruiters desire most?

A lot of recruiters are after basic, non-technical skills. Communication, teamwork, leadership,problem solving, and analytic thinking  are at the top of their list.

Have a look at the job ad to which you’re responding, and then check out other ads for similar positions. Notice anything in common? These are the skills recruiters want  for this job – make sure to you mention them.

Once you know which skills can boost your chances at landing your dream job, it’s time to consider how you should communicate these skills on your resume.

Lots of recruiters use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to make their lives easier while dealing with hundreds of resumes.  The keywords you found in the job description are what you should  add  to your resume to outsmart the bots. However, you should be cautious, adding only relevant keywords that can be backed up with quantifiable results.

Transferable skills are a good option as well. Even if they don’t  show up in the ad, they still present extra value. And your resume can’t have too much of that.

Look at people who already occupy your dream position. Which qualifications, skills, and accomplishments do they highlight on their LinkedIn profiles? If you boast similar skills, add them to your resume – you’ll show recruiters that your skill set makes you a top professional in your niche.

But that’s just the beginning. Check out this infographic for more tips on what skills to put on your resume.

info skills

****For this unique post, Campus to Career thanks Natalie from Uptowork!!****

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Bio: Natalie is a writer at Uptowork – Your Resume Builder [https://uptowork.com]. She writes about how to create successful resumes so that you can land  your dream job. When she isn’t writing, she eats tacos and reads complicated novels.