14 Amazing Ways to Make Your Resume Stand Out from the Crowd

15 08 2017

 

It’s a crowded job market and everyone is fiercely fighting for a piece of the pie. The average recruiter spends approximately six seconds reviewing every resume that crosses his desk. When you have a pile of resumes a foot high, you simply don’t have more time to give each resume.

This means that the standard, boring resume created in Microsoft Word isn’t going to cut it. In today’s competitive market, you need more than a template.

If you’re going to stand out amidst the obscene pile of resumes on a desk, you need to take serious steps. You need to get creative. To think different. To work outside the box. Maybe even to shatter the box altogether.

As it says over at CareerMine:

First impressions count, and the first impression that a potential employer will have of you is going to depend on how you present your resume. This is going to be your one and only chance to capture a potential employer’s attention, or for your resume to be tossed into the file of those they don’t want to pursue.

It’s not just about showing off your experience or education, although those things are certainly important. A great resume demonstrates the type of person you are. Your creativity. Your insight. Your willingness to think big and take bold action.

You may be thinking, I’m not going into a creative profession, so why do I need a creative resume? You need a creative resume because creativity is NOT the norm, especially in business positions. Thousands of people can follow accounting principles, but there aren’t many creative accountants (who aren’t in jail). Creativity sets you apart in the workplace.

With each resume, we’ve included a key takeaway that can be applied to any resume in any industry. You may not be an out-of-the-box thinker, but you can let these lessons push you as you create your own resume.

With that in mind, we’ve put together a list of 14 amazing examples of resumes. These are for your inspiration,  not your duplication. They should inspire you, not intimidate you. You don’t need to copy these ideas or try to replicate them. Simply learn from them.

#1 THE HAND-DRAWN INFOGRAPHIC

This gorgeous, hand-drawn infographic from Roberta Cicerone shows off her art abilities both in print form and on the web. Combining both a whimsical sensibility with a subtle sense of self promotion, this would clearly make an impression upon even the most cold-hearted recruiter.

Key Takeaway: Don’t be afraid to put your personality into your resume, whether that’s whimsical, humorous or analytical. Even if you’re applying for a more traditional job, such as accounting, include bits of your personality so potential employers can get a feel for you.

#2 THE ENVELOPE FOLDOUT PORTFOLIO

This foldout envelope portfolio from Stefania Capellupo is absolutely breathtaking, combining a series of envelopes, classy infographics and well-designed 5×8 cards. This resume/portfolio creates a sense of mystery and intrigue as each envelope is opened.

Key Takeaway: Do everything you can to make your resume legitimately interesting and intriguing. For example, if you’re in computer programming, you could create a small program within the resume just for the recruiter.

#3 THE KID ON A MISSION

This personal branding piece by Matthew Lynch proves that he has both courage and creativity in equal proportion. Combining a series of eye-catching graphics, humorous phrases and appropriate personal information, there’s no way a design studio could not be impressed by him.

Key Takeaway: If you only have 6 seconds to catch the attention of a recruiter, using color and graphics is a great place to start. You don’t have to be a designer to use these in your resume. There are numerous templates available that include graphics.

#4 THE RESUME BOOK

This resume book shows some serious passion and serious dedication. Not only are the images gorgeous, but the fact that Paula Del Mas took the time to get a booklet printed shows that she is clearly willing to go the extra mile. This is exactly what companies are hoping to find in a resume. It’s not just about the information, it’s also about the person.

Key Takeaway: Remember, your resume isn’t just communicating facts and information. It’s communicating something about you as a person, including your work ethic.

#5 THE GQ COVER

When Sumukh Mehta decided that he wanted to work for GQ men’s magazine, he decided to take drastic action. For three weeks, the 21 year old worked diligently to produce a resume that looked exactly like an issue of the magazine. This incredibly hard work paid off, resulting in him getting a six-month paid internship at GQ.

Key Takeaway: Study the company at which you’re applying. If possible, tailor your resume just for that company. Are you applying at a marketing firm that values analytics? Shape tailor your resume to highlight your analytics skills.

#6 THE CARD SAMPLES

These cards on a ring are a perfect example of the fact that a resume doesn’t need to fit the traditional size or look. By stringing together these colorful cards, Rebecca Fisk created a resume that is both pleasing to the eye and easy to read. This particular one would certainly stick out from a stack of papers simply by its shape and size.

Key Takeaway: Don’t be afraid to break from tradition when it comes to the format or medium of your resume. For example, if applying for an accounting position, you could create a resume in the form of an annual report.

#7 THE POP-UP FOLDER

When applying for a job as a visual designer, what better way to get people’s attention than by focusing on an image of an eye? By using unique imagery and an intriguing layout, Matthew Stucky demonstrated his ability to think differently than other visual designers. Plus, who doesn’t like the excitement of opening one envelope after another? It’s like Christmas!

Key Takeaway: Consider using imagery that is appropriate for the job you’re hoping to get. Again, numerous templates are available for use in any industry.

#8 THE SPY RESUME

Stanley Cheah Yu Xuan hit it out of the ballpark with this one. By creating a resume in the style of a spy or CIA profile (even including his fingerprints!), Xuan created one of the most unique resumes out there. The fingerprints alone would be enough to get attention.

Key Takeaway: Look for ways to incorporate small, unique touches into your resume that will demonstrate who you are.

#9 THE MINIMALIST RESUME

By tastefully using a minimalist font and generous white space, Cristina Cardoso managed to create a resume that contains all the necessary information and is easy on the eyes. By having her first name only at the top of the resume in a unique font, it sets it apart from the rest of the sheet.

Key Takeaway: Consider your use of whitespace and margins. You want your resume to be easy to read. This is true no matter what job you’re applying for. You don’t want your resume to be difficult on the eyes.

#10 THE TOP SECRET REPORT

Vidar Olufsen hit upon a brilliant idea when he created his resume in the form of a top secret report from the “Agency of Consideration and Establishment for Graphic Designers.”

In his own words: A combined resume and open job application formed as a humorous “Top Secret” report, giving away information about a “newly educated and creative designer, who have settled in the city.” This is a self-promotion project that was made to display a variety of skills as a graphic designer and get attention from local design agencies after I finished my studies.

Two words: mission accomplished.

Key Takeaway: When it’s appropriate, consider stepping way outside the box. You’ll want to do some research beforehand to know if it’s appropriate given your potential employer, but it can be a great way to stand out.

#11 THE FLOWCHART

To highlight what he could add to a potential employer, Craig Baute created this unique flowchart. It tactfully suggests potential problems the company may have, then shows how Craig will solve those problems. It positions him as a problem solver and leader and demonstrates his willingness to use his skills in a variety of ways.

Key Takeaway: Your resume should demonstrate both your skillset and how those skills will serve a potential employer. This shows that you’ve researched the employer and presented how you fit well within their organization.

#12 UP IN LIGHTS

HR specialist Liz Hickok was trying to get an HR job but was having trouble getting the attention of employers. So what did she do? She used Christmas lights and the front of her house to spell out both. Not only did she get lots of well wishes on LinkedIn, she also landed 4 different interviews.

Key Takeaway: When it comes to applying for a job, consider reaching out in a variety of ways. Obviously, you don’t want to be annoying about it, but you do want to broadcast yourself as much as possible.

#13 THE STORY

Pam Bailey, a communications expert, used her expertise as a storyteller to set herself apart from the competition. By including quotes, awards, and professional achievements, she demonstrates both her knowledge of marketing and her many accomplishments.

Key Takeaway: You resume must be centered around your expertise, demonstrating the incredible value you’ll add to a potential employer. Do you have stock investment expertise? Show that on your resume.

#14 THE GOOGLE ANALYTICS REPORT

As an online marketer, Simon Fortunini wanted to show off his skills in a way that would resonate with other online marketers, so he created a resume website that looks like Google Analytics. Each section was clickable and included further information about Simon, making it both eye-catching and simple to navigate.

Key Takeaway: Create a resume in a format that will be immediately interesting and recognizable to those in your industry. For example, if you’re in HR you could create a resume in the form of a personnel report.

CONCLUSION

Obviously, each of these key takeaways must be taken with a grain of salt. Most of these resumes were used to apply for work in creative industries. Nevertheless, the overall lessons can be applied across a variety of industries.

The point is simply this: your resume needs to stand out.

In whatever ways are appropriate for your industry, your resume still needs to stand out from the crowd. Recruiters, managers and HR reps are all deluged in resumes. It can be difficult to determine who really stands out from a group.

By learning from these resumes, you have a chance to get the attention you deserve.

****For this amazing post, Campus to Career thanks Jason Clayton!!!****

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Jason Clayton (M.Ed.) is dean of career and life calling at Cornerstone University. With more than 14 years of higher education experience, Jason equips students to find and develop their unique capacities in order to meet the 21st century talent needs of employers.

You can find the original post, along with many other articles, here.





The Do’s & Don’t’s of Presenting

16 05 2017

The presentation is a procedure where you represent your product or project in a speech, lecture or demonstration in order to educate your audience. For some, the anxiety level is high when you hear about giving presentations in front of people while some find it an easy calling. In other words, some freak out and some don’t! Before heading for a presentation, it’s important to loosen your nerves. Take a deep breath and begin. Concentrate on a specific object in the room to help you release your stress.

As a presenter, you have to be fully immersed in the topic in order to captivate the audience. Audience satisfaction is the goal of the presentation’s success. There’s a saying (some call it the “global rule” that the first impression is the last impression. Keep your presentation interactive and communicate with proper eye contact.

As you get started, here are some do’s and don’t’s on presenting, created by Walkerstone.

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3 Steps Towards a Perfect Resume

9 05 2017

Job hunting can be extraordinarily exhausting. It can be especially taxing when you feel like you’re not getting much response. Submitting your resume to dozens of employers week after week can feel like you’re fishing without a hook. However, one of the most effective things you can do to get a bite from potential employers is to spruce up your resume and cover letter. Let’s take a look at exactly what it takes to get the sparkling resume you’ve been dreaming of.

3 steps to a perfect resume

Cover Letter

Cover letters are truly commonplace in the job-seeking world these days. As such, it’s important to make sure that yours stands out. Essentially, what you want in a cover letter is a little bit more detail about who you are, what experience you have, and why you’re a great candidate.

Since this page should go before your resume, it is a first look into what type of employee you are and what professional experience you have. As a result, it can be quite easy to go overboard and provide the recruiter with too much information or irrelevant information. To avoid this, keep a few things in mind while writing your letter.

Keep your cover letter at a page long if you can. All of your job history, schooling, and references should be included in your resume, so you don’t have to go into detail about those topics in your cover letter. This is a great opportunity to tell your employer just a little bit about yourself. You might have some hidden talents that you practice as hobbies or you might want to explain your career goals or just expand on some awesome opportunities you’ve been able to be a part of in the past. Just make sure that you keep it short, concise, and to the point. If it doesn’t have a direct correlation with the potential employer hiring you, it doesn’t need to be in your cover letter.

References & Recommendations

Asking someone to be a reference or offer their personal recommendation for you as a spectacular employee is a tricky business. However, there is definitely a right and wrong way to do it. Namely, who you choose and why you choose them. Just because your good friend will say good things about you doesn’t necessarily mean you should put them on your resume.

Try to choose a reference that has worked with you in some sort of professional capacity. Ideal candidates for this task would be previous/current managers, teachers/professors, or other professional mentors. Let’s put it this way, putting down your parents or best friend from elementary school can come across as a bit childish. There are people in your life that know you have done great things and will go on to accomplish much more. It’s okay to let someone brag about you.

In addition, you shouldn’t need too many references. A good middle ground is about three references and/or recommendations. Unless they are going to list particularly amazing accomplishments of yours, I wouldn’t go above five. That just creates more work and research for your potential employer. Lastly, choose people that don’t all know you in the same way. For example, choosing three managers from the same job is not the way to go. Choosing one teacher, one manager, and one volunteer manager would be a great setup. They will all have unique things to say about their experience with you.

Once you decide on the best people for the job, you really need to make sure you have their permission before you let people give them a call or assume that they will explicitly recommend you for a position. Get in contact with that person and ask for the recommendation based on your previous professional interaction. Keep the request short and sweet. If they get back to you in a timely manner (probably a couple of days) then they are a good reference and will be responsive when potential employers give them a call. If they don’t respond or take too long, thank them for their time and move on.

Design

There are tons of fancy templates available on the web, but don’t be coaxed by all the frills you see on the page. Remember, your potential employer is probably looking at tons of these every single day. Keeping the page as de-cluttered and sleek as possible is the best plan of action.

Stick with simple black font on a white page. Obnoxious colors and themes are sure to turn off recruiters quickly. This doesn’t mean that you have to stick to New Times Roman size 10 or anything like that. There are plenty of downloadable fonts that look crisp, but also modern instead of dated and tacky. Try out a few before you decide on just one.

Your resume is simply to list your accomplishments. Again, try to make yours look as clean as possible. If you have additional information that you think is crucial for the recruiter to read, put it in the cover letter. Try not to expand too much on job details, personal reasons for starting or leaving school or a job etc. If there is information that the potential employer is curious about, it can be discussed in the interview. Although, you should feel confident that they have all the necessary professional information right in front of them already.

Creating the perfect resume takes years of experience. Don’t get discouraged if you feel like you have to make changes from time to time. As you grow in life and professionally, so will your ability to market yourself effectively to potential employers. It’s okay to ask for help from time to time. Co-workers and mentors can usually give you some insight into what a great resume looks like. However, take pride in your own style, accomplishments, and creativity. Making your resume your own is exactly what will attract the perfect employer. Good luck!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Trisha Miller!!****





10 Writing Apps & Tools for Students

11 04 2017

You’ve already put in years of hard work and schooling to get where you are today. Now it’s time to put together a cover letter and resume that reflects all of the work you’ve put forth. Don’t let careless mistakes make their way into your work and negatively impact the impression potential employers have of you. Utilize these 10 helpful online resources to improve the accuracy of your resume and cover letter, so you’re putting forward the appropriate reflection of yourself and your abilities.

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Hemingway App
Miss the mark on the reading and comprehension level you’re writing at, and you could miss out on a big opportunity. Get your work checked for errors and, at the same time, get scored on the readability scale with Hemingway App.

Resume Builder
This step-by-step resume builder walks you through the entire process of creating your resume, turning it into a PDF and sending it off to potential employers. Use one of their 10 free resume formats to quickly and easily put together your CV for distribution.

Paper Fellows
After experiencing numerous years in the education system, you probably have a good understanding of how seriously the accusation of plagiarism is taken. When it comes to your professional career, it can completely ruin it before it even gets started. Just avoid the chance of that altogether with the plagiarism checkers at Paper Fellows.

Readability Score
Get an accurate measure of where your writing lands on the readability scale with this tool that helps you determine if you should make any adjustments to your work to raise or lower the level of comprehension you’re writing at.

Cite It In
When you need to include various references and citations in your cover letter or resume, it’s essential that you do them properly. But composing citations can be confusing, with many tiny details to pay attention to and remember. With Cite It In, there’s no need to remember all of those details, because they do all of the work for you. All you have to do is give them the info, and they’ll put together the reference for you.

Resume Ready Lite
When you need to make slight changes to your resume with each new job posting you’re applying to, this app makes it easy to clone your existing resume and tweak it as needed. Make changes and apply to new postings any time and no matter where you are.

ProWritingAid
With ProWritingAid, you’ll have the ability to work in your preferred word processor while editing all at the same time. There’s no need to stop or slow down when you’re on a roll because this tool works as you write to point out mistakes you’ve made and suggest improvements to your writing that you could be making.

Easy Word Count
Don’t go overboard on the word count, and keep your tally in check with Easy Word Count’s accurate calculator. When you need or want to stay within a certain limit, this is the tool you’ll need to keep to the counts you’re bound to.

Ginger
Yes, this downloadable software lets you customize your writing experience to your personality, with colorful keyboards and emojis, but there’s so much more to it than just looks. The accuracy of this tool is incredible, giving you real-time corrections and advice, in addition to providing you with a number or writing tools and resources, including a dictionary and sentence rephrase tool.

Career Igniter Resume Builder
Create and edit your resume within minutes, right on your phone, and have it ready to send out to employers quickly. This makes is incredibly easy to apply for positions as they become available, even if you’re out on the go.

Present your best version of yourself with the help of these 10 incredibly useful and powerful apps and tools, that can assist you in composing your best, most accurate resumes and cover letters.

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Gloria Kopp!!****

Gloria KoppAbout: Gloria Kopp is a web content writer and an e-learning consultant from Manville city. She graduated from the University of Wyoming and started a career of a business writer, now she works as a blog editor at Studydemic. Besides, she is a regular contributor to such websites as Engadget, Bigassignments, Huffington Post etc.





18 Next-Level Résumé Tips

14 03 2017

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As you prepare to leave college and head into the world of work, you’ll have one thing on your mind: landing that dream job! Those first months after graduating can be a disheartening time. You may anticipate suffering knock-back after knock-back as you gradually acclimatize to the idea that you’re going to have to settle for less until you have a bit more experience. But you can improve your chances of getting a great position, or at least a nice leaping point, by sprucing up your CV in ways that we know make recruiters pay attention.

List your achievements and experience in reverse-chronological order, so as to grab their attention quickly – many recruiters will look at a résumé for less than ten seconds before moving on if they’re not interested. If you’re graduating for the first time, you might not have much experience to share yet – but you can convey what skills you have learnt in a succinct list of bullet points under your jobs, qualifications and extracurricular activities. Tailor these to each specific job to which you apply: go through their list of requirements, and see how you can promote personal examples under your own job or course descriptions. You may need to think laterally!

You can also make an impact by including a short but unique cover letter. This is your chance to get an edge over the 45% of applicants who won’t bother, and to address the hiring manager by name – a detail which you will of course research in advance, to show what a hot property you are.

For 18 simple tips on how to tweak your CV to perfection, check out this new infographic – it’s full of ways to make that résumé stand out, even if you don’t yet have the experience you feel you need.

****Big thanks to our friends at NeoMam Studios for the graphic!!****

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11 Simple Steps to Help Build New, Better Habits

21 02 2017

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Forming a new habit or behavior more conducive to getting what and where you want to go:

How is this accomplished and how long does it take? Building better habits is not an all-or-nothing process. Forming new patterns or habits may be gradual, little by little moving to a more positive and satisfying behavior.

Make small changes until a new pattern of attitudes and behavior is in place. You can also decide to stop a negative habit or attitude, like smoking, and go cold turkey and never smoke again.

New, more positive plans that you can implement with specific actions will take you closer and closer to the desired outcome and can be accomplished in a very short time. Once a decision is made, and acted on, you will reach a new, stable lifestyle.

Some helpful steps to adopt:

  1. Start simple: do not try to do everything in one day. Have a target that is attainable and keep at it for at least 30 days.
  1. Set your goals high, and break it down into small attainable steps. Losing 50 pounds may be overwhelming, but if you break it down to a smaller amount over a longer period of time then not only is it achievable, but easier to attain and maintain.
  1. Evaluate what knocks you off that new habit pattern. Strengthen and focus on the new habit.
  2. Establish relationships with people supportive of the new desired habit. Find role models. If you want to work out, establish relationships with people that go to the gym.
  1. Keep the desired habits or habit pattern actions in place for a minimum of 30-60 days. Easy changes will be incorporated quickly. Harder ones may take longer but do these daily.
  1. Schedule and follow through doing what you are committing to change. Create a strategy to apply consistently and improve your plan of action as results improve.
  1. Envision yourself having the end result. Keep reviewing and celebrating the benefits in your Journal.
  1. Review your Journal write-up, your game plan each morning, including the new habits. Track your progress.
  1. Put the new habit first, not last. If you want to start playing tennis, do not do it at the end of the day, rather do it when you are fresh and when you will benefit the most from doing so.
  1. Tell a friend or another about your new decision and invite their support. For example, I told my group of friends that I was writing a book. Each time I saw them I shared my progress as they asked about it. This kept me interested in a purpose for the book beyond myself, but envisioning the benefits for others as well. A purpose beyond mere self-benefits provides a greater-good purpose that means more value to all that are impacted.
  1. Determine what has to happen for you to know that you have a stable new habit by viewing your Journal entries progress feedback and acknowledge where you have achieved changed habits, and then define what is needed next to achieve the desired results!

How does one stay motivated?

What to do when:

There are moments where mood, fatigue, and lack of motivation, which are permitted, may create inconsistencies toward your desired goal and may cause your new habit to drop out.

Realize:

Minor setbacks are possible until a stable new habit is formulated and becomes a part of life. In order to motivate yourself and prevent set- backs, simply focus on your prior achievements and restore your purpose for change, and the benefits already achieved, and then re-commit with attention to consistency, no matter what happens in your life. Review negative thoughts and those folks with negative attitudes to avoid these. To have a more permanent change, you may ultimately have to change your environment and your schedule to match what works best for progress.

****For this great post, Campus to Career thanks Dr. Gerald J. Regni!!****

 

About the author: The above article is an excerpt from The Job Book: Find Yourself and a Job in 30 Days written by Dr. Gerald J. Regni and co-authored by Diane Phillips. The authors have worked out a simple to follow, user friendly road map that anyone can follow to find a career that fits, where one will follow his or her passion in easy steps. Start Your Career Finding Adventure Today! READ A LIFE CHANGING CHAPTER FOR FREE by visiting www.thejobbook.info.

 

 





5 College Activities to Build Skills for Your Career

20 12 2016

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Making the move from college to starting your career can be an exciting or stressful time for fresh graduates, depending on their preparation, chosen field, and a whole host of factors that are outside anyone’s control. In a market where some are saying a bachelor’s degree is the new high school diploma in terms of the minimum requirement to get a job, smart college students are developing relevant skills to separate themselves from the pack.

Here are 5 activities you can do while in college that will help you develop valuable skills to boost your resume and improve your job prospects after graduation.

Join career path-related societies – If you have an idea of what you might like to do after you graduate, join a related society on campus. For example, if you want to be a paramedic, you could get involved with the campus emergency services while in college. Aside from learning and applying some of the real skills you may use later, you’ll also develop valuable contacts and networks that may serve you well later. There are societies or organizations in most universities covering the major areas of study, including law societies, engineering societies, and more.

Attend campus talks and networking events – Many talks will be organized by student societies or by the departments themselves, and they are great places to mingle with your peers, professors, and outsiders who attend. Get on the email lists of any department or society you are interested in to see what events are coming up.

Get involved in student government – This could be connected to the particular organization related to your area of study, or to student life at your college in general. Skills you can develop here include leadership, project and event management, and networking. If you have leadership or management aspirations, this is a good way to cut your teeth.

Check out local Meetups – Getting involved in activities off-campus is a great way to expand your network beyond your circle of peers and classmates. Sites like meetup.com hold meetups and networking events on everything under the sun. There are over 140,000 active groups worldwide, with the highest concentration of groups in the biggest cities. The main skill you’ll be developing at meetups is networking, though depending on the meetup you choose to go to, you could be learning and actively doing a wide variety of skills and activities.

Give back with community work – Giving back to the community looks great on a resume, and if you get involved with a cause that is important to you, it gives you something to talk passionately about in an interview. You can learn a wide variety of career skills, depending on the type of community work you choose, but will also develop valuable interpersonal skills like empathy and teamwork.

Editor’s note: Campus to Career recommends that you explore involvement with your local Enactus team. There are over 400 university campuses active in the Enactus United States network and 1,700+ worldwide.  Click here to learn more and find a team. 

The common theme in all of these is networking; if you find an area of interest or activity you are passionate about, the best thing you can do is get more involved and develop a related network. Success in the job hunt today is about a combination of who you know, what you know, and what kind of commitment you have to continued learning and development of new skills.

What other college activities have you found helpful in preparing you for your career? Share your ideas in the comments below!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Joel Curry!!****

About: Joel Curry is a Career Advisor and Resume Expert who writes for Resume Companion. He helps job seekers craft more compelling cover letters and resumes, and gives career advice to those pursuing leadership and management level positions.