5 Tips for Getting an Awesome Job at a Startup

6 12 2016

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So, you want to work for a startup? They can be exciting to work for, offer up tremendous learning opportunities, and really pay off if you’re working for the best ones.

But getting hired by the best can certainly be a challenge. This is partly because startups have bought into the old Steve Jobs “only hire A players” mentality. But they are also looking for a specific kind of talent.

I’ve both run and worked for startups for the last 10 years. I’ve hired for them and been hired. Here’s my advice for getting in the door.

1. Show them that you’ve got startup-like experience.

Having worked at a startup before will help you a lot in getting hired at a startup. But this of course can be a chicken and egg problem. If you don’t have startup experience, how do you get it?

First off, you don’t necessarily have to have worked at a startup. Look for any experiences you’ve had where expectations were high and supervision was low. Somewhere you got thrown in the deep end and had to sink or swim.

My most startup like-experience, before I actually worked at a startup, was at a restaurant. My first night working at a particular restaurant when I was young was supposed to be training.

But when one of the servers didn’t show, and the restaurant got packed, they asked me to just try waiting as many tables as I could. I had to figure it out as I went, make decisions in the absence of guidance, and do the best I could with what I had.

If you don’t have startup experience, see if you can tell them about a situation you were in that relates.

You can also show this in the way you apply. When I applied to work with Betterteam, part of my test for being hired was writing a long-form article. To make the article really stand out, I cold called and interviewed several influential people in our space, something no other candidate did.

2. Show a love for learning.

The only thing that doesn’t change at a startup is the constant changing. Your job won’t fit into the typical job description.

There’s a good chance that you’ll be doing something completely different on day 1, day 30 and day 90.

Successful startup founders know this, and they’ll be looking for people who can adapt, learn and grow with the startup. Of course, you don’t want to just tell them you’re willing to learn. Show them.

Do you study languages or play instruments in your spare time? Practice a martial art, or run a hobby website?

This is something I’ve seen among my colleagues that make it at startups – they all have multiple hobbies and skills that they’re at varying stages of developing.

3. Know where to look.

When startups post jobs, they don’t always do it on traditional job boards.

A lot of them like to use niche boards that are more likely to bring in the type of candidates they’re looking for. Here are a few you’ll want to check out.

  • Weworkremotely – as the name suggests, mostly focused on remote jobs.

  • AngelList – lots of startups post their jobs here, and many report having success with it.

  • Hacker News – lists jobs with Y Combinator startups.

  • Authentic Jobs – lists jobs for developers, designers and various other startup positions.

4. Know the tools.

When I hired at my startup, I always hated getting resumes sent to me as Word files. PDFs were a little better, but what really showed me that someone had the same sensibilities as our company was getting a Google Doc resume link sent.

I’m not saying you have to be in love with Google Docs, but it’s good to figure out what tools a startup uses, and show familiarity with them.

Other tools that are popular among startups include Slack, Basecamp, Calendly, Asana, Github, Skype and Google Hangouts.

I doubt anyone is going to pass on a great hire because they sent something as a Word doc, but using and knowing the same tools that they use is definitely a sign of cultural fit.

5. Be helpful.

Maybe you’re just not quite ready yet. You either don’t have experience that convinces someone you can function as a startup employee, or don’t have the right skills.

While you’re waiting, see if you can find a way to be helpful to the startups you’d most like to work for.

Automattic, the company responsible for WordPress.com, notes on their job page that if you’re looking to be one of their Happiness Engineers, you may have spent some time helping people out in their forums.

If you’re interested in working for a few particular startups, keep an eye on them with social media, and see if there are ways you can contribute outside the company before you come on, and get on their radar.

That’s what I’ve got! It’s a good time to be looking for startup jobs, skilled employees are hard to find in general, and the startup space is especially in need of great employees. Get out there and get that job!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Paul Peters!!****

pp1About: Paul Peters is content marketer and job ad writer with Betterteam. Before Betterteam he spent 6 years building an education startup, where he was was involved with many aspects of the business, including hiring and marketing. He lives in Whitefish, Montana.





What’s Your 6-11?

21 09 2016

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Sure, we all have a 9-to-5, but what about a 6-11? You might be thinking, “what in the world is this guy talking about??” Let me explain. The concept of a 6-11 is based on the growing trend of twin-track career paths, commonly referred to as a “side hustle.”

Check out this fun interactive quiz from digital design and print powerhouse MOO engineered specifically to inspire people to discover their true passions AND help turn it into the job of their dreams.

Leveraging some seriously compelling data points from Wakefield Research and an interactive quiz, MOO has found there’s a major twin-track career phenomenon. In short, everyone (not just millennials) is on that side hustle tip.

Data from Wakefield Research for MOO

  • Nearly 3 in 4 people who work a 9 to 5 job (74%) admit they are unfulfilled by their current job

  • 44% of people are more interested in starting a side business now than they were 2 years ago

  • Almost 2 out of 3 millennials are anxious to follow their entrepreneurial instinct and start their own business

  • 90% feel that having a fulfilling job is one of the biggest factors in determining someone’s overall happiness

MOO is out to empower more people to take that first step, just like their “6-11 ambassadors,” founders of The Muse and Pintrill, who created their dream jobs while balancing a full time career, and are even offering the chance to win a full suite of branded materials to turn their dreams into a professional reality.

PS. I got Interpreter. Guess I need to brush up on my foreign language skills… 🙂





This Is The Cost Of Being An Adult

5 07 2016

Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions you make as an adult. But it’s not the only one. Once you’ve jumped on the adulting train, you’ll have to make countless choices. And many of them will involve money.

In order to do what’s best for you, you need to know about your options, including what different career opportunities pay and what basic necessities actually cost. The infographic below — created by PathSource, a career exploration solution — will ease your transition into adulthood by breaking down major milestones and the money that comes or goes along the way. Some highlights include:

  • Young adults with at least a bachelor’s degree make an average of $45,500, but the average salary for young adults with only a high school diploma is $28,000.
  • While the average monthly rent for young adults in New York City is $1,793, it’s just $956 in Houston.
  • 83% of young adults own their own car and spend an average of $329 a month to drive and maintain it.
  • 29% of young adults own a home and spend an average of $1,739 a month on their mortgage payment.

Check out the full infographic to find out what it really takes to make it as an adult!

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What are some other tough choices you have to start making as an adult? Let us know in the comments!





3 Questions to Ask Yourself after Graduation to Get Momentum

28 06 2016

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Graduation can be an exhilarating time. All of the work you have put in over the past few years has finally paid off. You are finally able to step into the working world and put to use all the information you have been taught. The world is your oyster. Every opportunity is at the end of your fingertips. But for some reason that light at the end of the tunnel has become distant again. Maybe you are feeling overwhelmed, underwhelmed or just plain stuck. What you need is more than the inspiring cliches like Nike’s “Just do it” or “Leap and the net will appear”. What you need is momentum!

Momentum means you’re moving, and things are happening. It means you’re making progress, and it feels good! While it is human nature to wish and hope for things, you have to be willing to take initiative and answer the hard questions to get you to where you desire to be. Here are three questions to ask yourself that will get you closer to attaining the momentum you are seeking as you transition from graduation.

What is really stopping you?
Take an honest look at where you are in this transitional season of life. What is holding you back? Are the people you count on for support not showing up for you? Are your goals attainable? Or are you simply drained from busting your tail for the past few years and you need a breather?

Once you answer this question, take it to heart and put to action what it is you need to move beyond the barrier. Whether you need to find a new support system, redefine your goals or indulge in a little R&R to become rejuvenated and refreshed, make it happen!

What do you want to be known for?

“Carve your name on hearts, not tombstones. A legacy is etched into the minds of others and the stories they share about you.”  – Shannon L. Alder


This is a big question to answer. Take some time today and think about the legacy you want to leave behind. Do you want to be a memorable leader? Do you want to be known for your compassion for others? Once you clarify your vision and declare the direction you are headed, you will soon uncover the momentum you are in need of and desiring for yourself.


Who can you learn from?

“One of the greatest values of mentors is the ability to see ahead what others cannot see and to help them navigate a course to their destination.” – John C. Maxwell

Whether we need to get out of our own heads or are seeking guidance, mentorship is crucial in advancement. Finding a mentor or someone who can provide insight and lend a listening ear can be very beneficial in many aspects of life, especially as we are in the midst of transitions through life stages. Many times when we sit down and talk to someone about where we are and where we want to be, we hear a story from someone who has had the same issues and sometimes even bigger hurdles to jump than we have had to face. Hearing that they had it hard and made it, helps us recommit to the work ahead.

While getting momentum may sounds simple, the work isn’t easy – but it is always worth it. The time is now! Answer the through questions and break through the inertia that’s keeping you from your dreams! Get momentum and go!

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Jason and Jodi Womack met in the front row of history class in college. Jodi asked to borrow Jason’s notes. He said, “No.” That was the beginning of a beautiful relationship. Jason’s “No” quickly turned into a “Yes” and 23 years later they’re still partners in work and life –  running their own international consulting firm, The Womack Company, where they help busy professionals be more productive through coaching, consulting, their Get Momentum Leadership Academy, and now their book, Get Momentum: How To Start When You’re Stuck. (Wiley, May 2016)





Best Cities for New Grads

8 03 2016

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If you’re a recent college grad or are going to graduate soon, you’re about to be faced with a choice — now that you finally have your degree, you need to move somewhere and start your career.

Where should you go? There are a lot of factors to consider.

One is the economy of the city you’ll be moving to — go where the jobs are! In a strong economy, you can not only land the job you want, but also get paid well to do it. Good local healthcare, access to transportation, shopping and other amenities are also worth examining.

Another factor is the city’s culture. Life shouldn’t be all about work, so consider what you can do for fun. If a city has a vibrant nightlife and great places to eat and hang out, you’ll probably be happier there. Local demographics are also key, as you’ll want to have people your age to enjoy the culture with.

Perhaps the most important factor for many college grads is affordability — how much does it cost to live in the area? Not everyone’s first job out of college is going to rake in the big bucks, and most college students have loan debt to deal with, too. Look for a city where the cost of living isn’t going to keep you from enjoying a life there.

With economy, culture and affordability in mind, the following cities all pass the test, making them a few of the best cities for recent college graduates.

Austin, Texas

Austin is known for its mild climate and for an unofficial motto, “Keep Austin Weird,” that attracts support for hip local businesses. The city’s home to a vibrant creative culture and to one of the biggest arts and music festivals in the U.S.

The city is also well known for its tech industry, with top employers that include Apple, Google, Microsoft, IBM, Dell and Samsung. Austin ranks first in the nation for millennial population, which is 29 percent. The unemployment rate in 2014 was a mere 3.7 percent. At just $1,656, the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment is low, making Austin an affordable option for young graduates.

Seattle, Washington

Millennials are flocking to Seattle not only to rent — the median for a two-bedroom apartment is just $2,596 — but also to buy homes. The city is becoming increasingly trendy for young professionals, who make up roughly 28 percent of its population.

The home of the futuristic Space Needle and the headquarters of Amazon, Starbucks and Microsoft is also surrounded by a scenic mountain landscape for those who love to hike and explore outdoors.

Denver, Colorado

The Mile-High City claims to have 300 days of sunshine a year — this isn’t quite true, but Denver still boasts great weather. What the city does have is the largest park system in the country, beautiful nearby mountains and a low cost of living for its 26 percent millennial population. The median rent for a two-bedroom apartment was just $2025 in 2014.

Denver’s huge, walkable downtown area is also home to a ton of breweries and pubs, so you and your friends will never get bored on the weekends.

Minneapolis, Minnesota

A perfect city for recent grads, Minneapolis boasts an incredibly low cost of living for the 31 percent of residents that are millennials, with a median rent of only $1,772 for a two-bedroom apartment.

A low unemployment rate of 4.1 percent means you’ll also have a good chance at landing a job with one of the many Fortune 500 companies located in the city, which include Target, Best Buy, General Mills, Land O’Lakes and St. Jude Medical.

Iowa City, Iowa

This one might seem out of place due to its small size, but Iowa City is a college town with a strong economy. The unemployment rate is low, at three percent, and Rosalind Greenstein of the American Institute for Economic Research says that “a growing technology corridor has improved economic opportunity in Iowa City, and low rents, more restaurants and bars, as well as a diverse population, also attract young people.”

The University of Iowa is a major employer, as are Oral B Laboratories, Proctor & Gamble and a host of other big businesses drawn in by the college population.

Boston, Massachusetts

Boston has a diverse range of thriving industries for job-seekers — healthcare, social assistance, finance, education and biotech are all big fields in and around the city, which is home to 12 Fortune 500 companies. The unemployment rate in 2014 was only 4.9 percent, and the median income for millennials was $58,040 — which couples great with an average rent of $4,498 for a two-bedroom apartment.

About a third of the Boston population consists of millennials, and there are plenty of bars and restaurants to hang out at after work. Lots of outdoor space — including the oldest public park and the first public beach in the U.S. — walking trails, a concentrated downtown area and comprehensive public transit make finding fun things to do both easy and affordable.

Washington, D.C.

If you’ve never visited the nation’s capital, it has a lot going for it — think free museums, beautiful parks and monuments, and a solid food and bar scene. Residents walk and bike everywhere.

DC is another young city with a millennial population of 29 percent, many of whom are attracted by government jobs on Capitol Hill. Unemployment sits at 4.9 percent, and the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment is about $3,287.

Raleigh, N.C.

Raleigh is a part of the Research Triangle of North Carolina, where grads looking for a career in the tech industry will thrive. 26 percent of the population are millennials, unemployment sits at 4.8 percent and the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment is $2,431.

Raleigh is a smaller city that isn’t quite as hustle-and-bustle as some of the others on this list, and it holds lots of outdoor recreational areas and great entertainment options.

Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore is underrated and affordable — the median rent for a two-bedroom apartment is only $1,586! It has a growing millennial population drawn by the vibrant social scene, who often work in the industrious health and science fields.

Excellent nightlife and public transit are a few more reasons why recent grads love Charm City.

Cincinnati, Ohio

A city with a slowly growing population of millennials, Cincinnati has an economy that, along with top employers like Kroger, makes it attractive for recent grads.

Ten percent of Cincy is park land, so the 27 percent millennial population can enjoy plenty of time outdoors. Unemployment in the city is below-average at 4.6 percent, and median rent for a two-bedroom apartment is an affordable $2,138.

No matter where you choose to move after graduation, make sure you do some research. Above all, have fun and make the most of wherever you land your first big job.

sarah landrum head shotAbout the author: Sarah Landrum is a graduate from Penn State with degrees in Marketing and PR. Now, she’s a freelance writer and career blogger sharing advice on navigating the work world and achieving happiness and success in your career. She’s also a member of the Campus to Career family, serving as a featured contributor on a regular basis. You can find her tweeting during boring speeches @SarahLandrum

 





And the Hits Keep On Comin’…

10 02 2016

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February 10, 2016. This date might not have much significance to you, but it has great meaning to me. You see, today is my official blogging anniversary. Six years ago, I decided to take a hobby and shape into what you know as Campus to Career. I was sitting in the airport, bound for Singapore to participate in Enactus World Cup (then known as SIFE), an event that brought together real-life world-changers from over 40 countries. I figured it was time to get serious about this or give up altogether. I’m glad I got serious.

I’ve been fortunate to share my point of view on career advice, collaborate with some of the best in the business, and help young people succeed in their careers all over the world. Campus to Career has made several “top career advice” lists and we’ve been humbled by each and every one.

But, here’s the thing: NONE of this would have happened without YOUR support. Seriously. YOU make this little career advice blog such an incredible source of information. There are some particular individuals I’d like to call out with a personal thank you. They are:

Family – Mom, dad, siblings, cousins, my amazing wife…THANK YOU. I wouldn’t be the person I am today without your support, influence and swift kick in the butt from time to time!

Friends – I’m happy to say that there are simply too many to name here, but again, THANK YOU. Your support has meant the world to me.

Teachers – From my kindergarten teacher to my speech & debate coach to a few very special college professors…thanks for helping me find my way.

Mentors – Can I just say all of the above? Whether they’ve been official mentors or unofficial, they’ve been instrumental in my success, guiding me, listening, and offering perspective – in my career and in life.

Peers – Thank you for leading by example. There are millions of career advice experts, bloggers and “gurus” out there. I’ve been very fortunate to connect with many of you over the years and not only is Campus to Career stronger and better because of it, I’m a better person thanks to your openness and support to help make this world a better place. Many of the “hits” mentioned in the title of this post are because we collaborated to provide unique content to Campus to Career readers! (Thank you.)

Hits like these:

Here’s to 6 awesome years of partnership. I’m looking forward to many more!

COMING SOON: A new Campus to Career website design! We’re looking for volunteers to help us design a new logo. Interested? Email your pitch and sample to kirk.baumann@att.net. If selected, we’ll credit you for the work when the new site launches!





Resume Wars: Dark Side or Light?

12 01 2016

By now, there’s a good chance you’ve seen the new Star Wars movie. If you haven’t, don’t worry – this post doesn’t contain spoilers. I came across this unique article on the subject and wanted to share it with you. Have you ever thought about what Lord Vader’s resume would look like? Well, search no more! Check out this fun post from our friends over at EnhanceCV. Enjoy!

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In a galaxy far, far away, resumes were drastically changing over time.

From a simple, blank piece of paper filled with your experiences, to a beautifully designed, fancy hologram, describing you not only as an employee but as an individual, as well.

In the light of the upcoming Star Wars movies, our team decided to create Anakin Skywalker’s resume before turning to the dark side, and after becoming Darth Vader. See how our format works, and how it shows more than just your work experience, disregarding whether you’re a Jedi or a Sith!

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Before turning to the dark side, Anakin Skywalker was an exemplary Jedi. He studied at the Jedi Temple on Coruscant, and after graduation, crafted his own light from three crystals on the planet Ilum. After becoming a full-fledged Jedi, his career seemed bright – having won numerous battles, stopping the invasion of Naboo, and becoming the Counsellor’s personal representative. Everything changed, however, once he started having visions his wife’s failed childbirth, leading him to rebel against the Jedi and eventually turning into Darth Vader.

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Download Anakin Skywalker Resume

Vader was the opposite of everything Anakin Skywalker represented. He’d committed countless atrocities, from murdering most of the Jedi, to blowing up an entire planet.

At the end of the series, however, Darth Vader did end up finding redemption: saving his son’s life, and bringing down the emperor – thus finally fulfilling his destiny.

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Download Darth Vader Resume

For more action-packed resumes, check Enhance CV’s Facebook page here.


Icons by:
Stephen Plaster / Luis Prado / Alex Auda Samora / Christelle Mozzati / Yorlmar Campos / Anthony Rees / Wayne Tyler Sall / Becca / Hayashi Fumihiro / Chris Kerr / Juan Pablo Bravo

****We thank Nick Greene for this post from a galaxy far, far away!!****

Read the original post here.