4 Little Ways to Stand Out As an Intern

25 07 2017

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Competition for an internship is quite high. And, the rules for getting your resume noticed have changed considerably. The key to getting a clear shot at a coveted internship is to stand out in the crowd of resumes and applications. First, it is important to remember the rules of marketing. You’ve got to focus on creating a product that the consumer desires, encouraging the reader to pay just a bit more attention to your marketing package or your resume.

1. Check Your Marketing Package

Surprisingly, a large number of applicants seeking an internship are losing out because they are not taking a serious look at their resume, they fail to update their resume, or they do not have a resume. Remember, the resume, cover-letter, and application is your marketing package to the recruiter. It should provide the necessary information that demonstrates that you are the right person for the internship. Certainly, well-crafted resume without grammatical errors will open the door to an interview. Check your resume over carefully with spell-check and your own eyes several times before submitting.

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2. Experience Seals The Deal

Recent graduates and college students might assume that they do not have the experience required to seal the internship deal. Think again. Any relevant experience will get you one step closer to that internship. Don’t dismiss a part-time job that you held during the summer or after school. Even your volunteer experience with an organization might work in your favor. For example, if you are pressing for an internship with a fashion magazine, impress the reader with your experience writing a fashion blog, publishing your own newsletter, or writing for a college newspaper. These jobs definitely provided valuable experience.

Related post: Get Involved, Get Experience

3. Apply Early

It’s surprising, the number of people that delay applying for internships. The fact is that a growing number of organizations and business institutions actively seek qualified interns all throughout the year. This is good news for those that were worried about the high competition that erupts for those summer internships at some leading organizations. Here is an idea. Select several organizations that are actively recruiting interns through the year to increase the odds that you will get selected.

4. Perfect Your Interview Skills

Perhaps, you’ve sent out your glowing cover letter and resume that highlights all your wonderful skills, training, education, and accomplishments. The recruiter has contacted you for an interview. Mission accomplished. Well, not so fast. Now, it’s time to brush up on your interview skills to seal the deal. Clearly, it’s vital to make a good first impression with the recruiter. Dress appropriately for the interview. Always arrive on time for the interview. Take note of your body language too. For example, make eye contact with the recruiter, offer a firm handshake, try to appear comfortable and relaxed during the entire interview session.

Remember, the interviewer will probably have all your information in front of them. Summarize the highlights of your information. Let the interviewer lead the interview. Don’t try to take control and look too desperate. Listen to the interviewer and make sure that you understand the questions, before providing an answer. Try to look confident and maintain a pleasant smile throughout the interview. End the interview with a firm handshake.

Later on, send a thank you note to the interviewer to confirm your interest in the internship with the company. Following the tips in this piece should lead you to accomplish your goals and landing that dream internship with a great company.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS BONUS RESOURCES ON RESUMES, INTERVIEW TIPS, + MORE!

****For this great post, Campus to Career thanks Helen Cartwright!!****

Helen Cartwright

Helen Cartwright is a passionate blogger, who excels in the Digital Marketing, Technology and Template Ideas niche. When not wired in marketing strategies she ghost-write for a variety of authors who have their work published on leading online media channels such as The Huffington Post and Entrepreneur.com.





3 Steps Towards a Perfect Resume

9 05 2017

Job hunting can be extraordinarily exhausting. It can be especially taxing when you feel like you’re not getting much response. Submitting your resume to dozens of employers week after week can feel like you’re fishing without a hook. However, one of the most effective things you can do to get a bite from potential employers is to spruce up your resume and cover letter. Let’s take a look at exactly what it takes to get the sparkling resume you’ve been dreaming of.

3 steps to a perfect resume

Cover Letter

Cover letters are truly commonplace in the job-seeking world these days. As such, it’s important to make sure that yours stands out. Essentially, what you want in a cover letter is a little bit more detail about who you are, what experience you have, and why you’re a great candidate.

Since this page should go before your resume, it is a first look into what type of employee you are and what professional experience you have. As a result, it can be quite easy to go overboard and provide the recruiter with too much information or irrelevant information. To avoid this, keep a few things in mind while writing your letter.

Keep your cover letter at a page long if you can. All of your job history, schooling, and references should be included in your resume, so you don’t have to go into detail about those topics in your cover letter. This is a great opportunity to tell your employer just a little bit about yourself. You might have some hidden talents that you practice as hobbies or you might want to explain your career goals or just expand on some awesome opportunities you’ve been able to be a part of in the past. Just make sure that you keep it short, concise, and to the point. If it doesn’t have a direct correlation with the potential employer hiring you, it doesn’t need to be in your cover letter.

References & Recommendations

Asking someone to be a reference or offer their personal recommendation for you as a spectacular employee is a tricky business. However, there is definitely a right and wrong way to do it. Namely, who you choose and why you choose them. Just because your good friend will say good things about you doesn’t necessarily mean you should put them on your resume.

Try to choose a reference that has worked with you in some sort of professional capacity. Ideal candidates for this task would be previous/current managers, teachers/professors, or other professional mentors. Let’s put it this way, putting down your parents or best friend from elementary school can come across as a bit childish. There are people in your life that know you have done great things and will go on to accomplish much more. It’s okay to let someone brag about you.

In addition, you shouldn’t need too many references. A good middle ground is about three references and/or recommendations. Unless they are going to list particularly amazing accomplishments of yours, I wouldn’t go above five. That just creates more work and research for your potential employer. Lastly, choose people that don’t all know you in the same way. For example, choosing three managers from the same job is not the way to go. Choosing one teacher, one manager, and one volunteer manager would be a great setup. They will all have unique things to say about their experience with you.

Once you decide on the best people for the job, you really need to make sure you have their permission before you let people give them a call or assume that they will explicitly recommend you for a position. Get in contact with that person and ask for the recommendation based on your previous professional interaction. Keep the request short and sweet. If they get back to you in a timely manner (probably a couple of days) then they are a good reference and will be responsive when potential employers give them a call. If they don’t respond or take too long, thank them for their time and move on.

Design

There are tons of fancy templates available on the web, but don’t be coaxed by all the frills you see on the page. Remember, your potential employer is probably looking at tons of these every single day. Keeping the page as de-cluttered and sleek as possible is the best plan of action.

Stick with simple black font on a white page. Obnoxious colors and themes are sure to turn off recruiters quickly. This doesn’t mean that you have to stick to New Times Roman size 10 or anything like that. There are plenty of downloadable fonts that look crisp, but also modern instead of dated and tacky. Try out a few before you decide on just one.

Your resume is simply to list your accomplishments. Again, try to make yours look as clean as possible. If you have additional information that you think is crucial for the recruiter to read, put it in the cover letter. Try not to expand too much on job details, personal reasons for starting or leaving school or a job etc. If there is information that the potential employer is curious about, it can be discussed in the interview. Although, you should feel confident that they have all the necessary professional information right in front of them already.

Creating the perfect resume takes years of experience. Don’t get discouraged if you feel like you have to make changes from time to time. As you grow in life and professionally, so will your ability to market yourself effectively to potential employers. It’s okay to ask for help from time to time. Co-workers and mentors can usually give you some insight into what a great resume looks like. However, take pride in your own style, accomplishments, and creativity. Making your resume your own is exactly what will attract the perfect employer. Good luck!

****For this post, Campus to Career thanks Trisha Miller!!****





18 Next-Level Résumé Tips

14 03 2017

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As you prepare to leave college and head into the world of work, you’ll have one thing on your mind: landing that dream job! Those first months after graduating can be a disheartening time. You may anticipate suffering knock-back after knock-back as you gradually acclimatize to the idea that you’re going to have to settle for less until you have a bit more experience. But you can improve your chances of getting a great position, or at least a nice leaping point, by sprucing up your CV in ways that we know make recruiters pay attention.

List your achievements and experience in reverse-chronological order, so as to grab their attention quickly – many recruiters will look at a résumé for less than ten seconds before moving on if they’re not interested. If you’re graduating for the first time, you might not have much experience to share yet – but you can convey what skills you have learnt in a succinct list of bullet points under your jobs, qualifications and extracurricular activities. Tailor these to each specific job to which you apply: go through their list of requirements, and see how you can promote personal examples under your own job or course descriptions. You may need to think laterally!

You can also make an impact by including a short but unique cover letter. This is your chance to get an edge over the 45% of applicants who won’t bother, and to address the hiring manager by name – a detail which you will of course research in advance, to show what a hot property you are.

For 18 simple tips on how to tweak your CV to perfection, check out this new infographic – it’s full of ways to make that résumé stand out, even if you don’t yet have the experience you feel you need.

****Big thanks to our friends at NeoMam Studios for the graphic!!****

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21 Interview Tips to Help You Shine

4 10 2016

Most college students have held jobs in the past—whether a full-time job in the summer, a part-time job during the school year, or both. Yet searching for that first “real” job after college can be intimidating. You’ve finally earned a shiny new degree, but you’re likely competing against candidates with more experience than you.

The good news is, hiring managers don’t necessarily select the candidate whose resume is the longest. Job interviews play a huge role in who lands the position because companies want to hire someone who fits in with their culture and team. Most of the time, they would much rather invest the resources to train a recent graduate than hire someone else who’s close-minded and unteachable.

This infographic from Company Folders  an online printing company, will give you 21 tips to put your best foot forward before, during, and after the interview. A few highlights include:

  • Bring any materials you need, such as business cards or a portfolio
  • Research the company beforehand
  • Allow extra time for traffic
  • Ask for clarification if you don’t understand a question
  • Take your time answering the question
  • Follow up with a thank-you note or email

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Boost the Skills Section of Your Resume [Infographic]

9 08 2016

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Are you a talented content marketer?

Or perhaps you’ve got killer sales skills?

Many candidates ignore their skills section, believing that recruiters focus more on other parts of their resumes. That’s a huge mistake. Your skill set is something you should expose to the world – it’s the foundation of your professional identity.

Consider this – recruiters spend  an average 6 seconds looking at a resume  before deciding whether it’s worth their time. Knowing what skills to put on a resume [https://uptowork.com/blog/what-skills-to-put-on-a-resume] is critical so that you can grab recruiters’ attention at this stage in the  process.  And you can do that with a well crafted skills section.

But first things first – how do you find out  what skills recruiters desire most?

A lot of recruiters are after basic, non-technical skills. Communication, teamwork, leadership,problem solving, and analytic thinking  are at the top of their list.

Have a look at the job ad to which you’re responding, and then check out other ads for similar positions. Notice anything in common? These are the skills recruiters want  for this job – make sure to you mention them.

Once you know which skills can boost your chances at landing your dream job, it’s time to consider how you should communicate these skills on your resume.

Lots of recruiters use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to make their lives easier while dealing with hundreds of resumes.  The keywords you found in the job description are what you should  add  to your resume to outsmart the bots. However, you should be cautious, adding only relevant keywords that can be backed up with quantifiable results.

Transferable skills are a good option as well. Even if they don’t  show up in the ad, they still present extra value. And your resume can’t have too much of that.

Look at people who already occupy your dream position. Which qualifications, skills, and accomplishments do they highlight on their LinkedIn profiles? If you boast similar skills, add them to your resume – you’ll show recruiters that your skill set makes you a top professional in your niche.

But that’s just the beginning. Check out this infographic for more tips on what skills to put on your resume.

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****For this unique post, Campus to Career thanks Natalie from Uptowork!!****

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Bio: Natalie is a writer at Uptowork – Your Resume Builder [https://uptowork.com]. She writes about how to create successful resumes so that you can land  your dream job. When she isn’t writing, she eats tacos and reads complicated novels.





CVs and Résumés: Get Them Right to Get the Job (Infographic)

24 05 2016

It’s as simple as this: without an excellent résumé, your prospects of finding employment are slim to nil. Your résumé is your first impression on a recruiter, and with so many others like you also trying to make a distinctive first impression, it will need to be particularly strong to warrant further attention from the recruiter.

In that case, it’s well worth taking the time to analyze your résumé and make sure that it is word perfect before submitting it to a recruiter. That might seem insultingly obvious, but the stark truth is that a large number of applicants fail to do this. Recruiters are constantly sent applications with glaring errors such as spelling mistakes, sloppy layout, inconsistent or even false information and buzzwords which were clearly pulled from the Internet and slapped incoherently into the résumé.

Australian payroll and contractor management company Ayers has identified the main aspects of excellent résumé writing by honing in on three categories.

Spelling/Grammar: When you’re finished writing the résumé, proofread it carefully. Ensure that you use the correct spelling for the region in which you’re applying, e.g. if you’re applying for a job in California, use the American spelling of words such as ‘labor’ and ‘aluminum’. Then proofread it again. Only use capital letters at the start of sentences or in proper nouns. When all that’s done, it’s time for another proofread. In fact, get another person to proof it for you in case you’ve missed anything.

Layout: A résumé is a professional, formal document, so use black type throughout and adopt a neutral font such as Arial or Times New Roman. The snazzy fonts and colors belong elsewhere. Ensure that your résumé is consistent in its layout and favor the use of bullet points, as this will make it easier to read than chunks of text where the recruiter is straining to determine what are the most pertinent points.

Content: This is the most important aspect of the whole lot. This is your audition for the role being advertised, so make it count. Talk yourself and your achievements up as much as you can without delving into lying territory. If the job application asked for specific skills or qualifications, address these accordingly. Support any claims you make with concrete evidence.

Follow these rules and your résumé is all the more likely to grab a recruiter’s attention. Read the infographic below for further advice.

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5 Tips for a Successful Skype Interview

12 04 2016

No matter what type of job you’re seeking (or going to seek),  odds are that you’ll do a Skype or teleconferencing interview. Companies especially love to use this to screen out candidates, as it’s quick and cheaper than flying you onsite.

Skype interviews can feel unnerving because you’re not physically in the same space as the person. But managed correctly, Skype interviews can be successful.

picjumbo.com_HNCK4011Here are my tips for a successful video interview (#4 is especially important).

  1.  Test out the technology at least half an hour  before hand and make sure your account and your microphone works.Have your interview contact’s phone and email prepped, in case there are tech issues and you need to speak with them in an alternative format.

  2.  Put your laptop on a regular desk (or kitchen table if you don’t have a desk at home),so you can recreate the same height and depth of sitting across from someone.

  3. Wear what you’d wear to an in-person interview, i.e.  a suit. At worst, you look overdressed, at best you seem prepared and professional.

  4. During interview, look straight into the webcam (important as it’s a way to make “eye” contact);  resist the urge to look at the person’s face the whole time as you’re not actually looking at him/her.
  1. End the interview with questions. This is universal, whether you’re in-person or doing a teleconferencing interview. You must ask three good questions, preferably those that get at what success in the job looks like, what traits/ attributes the company wants in that hire, etc.

Using these tips should help you nail that next Skype interview.

****For this informative post, Campus to Career thanks Mishri Someshwar!!****

About the author: Mishri Someshwar helps entrepreneurs and senior business leaders craft effective speeches, conference presentations, and anything else they need to sound good in front of investors, colleagues, conference attendees, and more. Past clients include startup founders, sales VPs and C-suite leaders. To get her answers on the three mostly commonly asked job interview questions, click here.