18 Next-Level Résumé Tips

14 03 2017

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As you prepare to leave college and head into the world of work, you’ll have one thing on your mind: landing that dream job! Those first months after graduating can be a disheartening time. You may anticipate suffering knock-back after knock-back as you gradually acclimatize to the idea that you’re going to have to settle for less until you have a bit more experience. But you can improve your chances of getting a great position, or at least a nice leaping point, by sprucing up your CV in ways that we know make recruiters pay attention.

List your achievements and experience in reverse-chronological order, so as to grab their attention quickly – many recruiters will look at a résumé for less than ten seconds before moving on if they’re not interested. If you’re graduating for the first time, you might not have much experience to share yet – but you can convey what skills you have learnt in a succinct list of bullet points under your jobs, qualifications and extracurricular activities. Tailor these to each specific job to which you apply: go through their list of requirements, and see how you can promote personal examples under your own job or course descriptions. You may need to think laterally!

You can also make an impact by including a short but unique cover letter. This is your chance to get an edge over the 45% of applicants who won’t bother, and to address the hiring manager by name – a detail which you will of course research in advance, to show what a hot property you are.

For 18 simple tips on how to tweak your CV to perfection, check out this new infographic – it’s full of ways to make that résumé stand out, even if you don’t yet have the experience you feel you need.

****Big thanks to our friends at NeoMam Studios for the graphic!!****

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21 Interview Tips to Help You Shine

4 10 2016

Most college students have held jobs in the past—whether a full-time job in the summer, a part-time job during the school year, or both. Yet searching for that first “real” job after college can be intimidating. You’ve finally earned a shiny new degree, but you’re likely competing against candidates with more experience than you.

The good news is, hiring managers don’t necessarily select the candidate whose resume is the longest. Job interviews play a huge role in who lands the position because companies want to hire someone who fits in with their culture and team. Most of the time, they would much rather invest the resources to train a recent graduate than hire someone else who’s close-minded and unteachable.

This infographic from Company Folders  an online printing company, will give you 21 tips to put your best foot forward before, during, and after the interview. A few highlights include:

  • Bring any materials you need, such as business cards or a portfolio
  • Research the company beforehand
  • Allow extra time for traffic
  • Ask for clarification if you don’t understand a question
  • Take your time answering the question
  • Follow up with a thank-you note or email

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Boost the Skills Section of Your Resume [Infographic]

9 08 2016

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Are you a talented content marketer?

Or perhaps you’ve got killer sales skills?

Many candidates ignore their skills section, believing that recruiters focus more on other parts of their resumes. That’s a huge mistake. Your skill set is something you should expose to the world – it’s the foundation of your professional identity.

Consider this – recruiters spend  an average 6 seconds looking at a resume  before deciding whether it’s worth their time. Knowing what skills to put on a resume [https://uptowork.com/blog/what-skills-to-put-on-a-resume] is critical so that you can grab recruiters’ attention at this stage in the  process.  And you can do that with a well crafted skills section.

But first things first – how do you find out  what skills recruiters desire most?

A lot of recruiters are after basic, non-technical skills. Communication, teamwork, leadership,problem solving, and analytic thinking  are at the top of their list.

Have a look at the job ad to which you’re responding, and then check out other ads for similar positions. Notice anything in common? These are the skills recruiters want  for this job – make sure to you mention them.

Once you know which skills can boost your chances at landing your dream job, it’s time to consider how you should communicate these skills on your resume.

Lots of recruiters use Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) to make their lives easier while dealing with hundreds of resumes.  The keywords you found in the job description are what you should  add  to your resume to outsmart the bots. However, you should be cautious, adding only relevant keywords that can be backed up with quantifiable results.

Transferable skills are a good option as well. Even if they don’t  show up in the ad, they still present extra value. And your resume can’t have too much of that.

Look at people who already occupy your dream position. Which qualifications, skills, and accomplishments do they highlight on their LinkedIn profiles? If you boast similar skills, add them to your resume – you’ll show recruiters that your skill set makes you a top professional in your niche.

But that’s just the beginning. Check out this infographic for more tips on what skills to put on your resume.

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****For this unique post, Campus to Career thanks Natalie from Uptowork!!****

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Bio: Natalie is a writer at Uptowork – Your Resume Builder [https://uptowork.com]. She writes about how to create successful resumes so that you can land  your dream job. When she isn’t writing, she eats tacos and reads complicated novels.





CVs and Résumés: Get Them Right to Get the Job (Infographic)

24 05 2016

It’s as simple as this: without an excellent résumé, your prospects of finding employment are slim to nil. Your résumé is your first impression on a recruiter, and with so many others like you also trying to make a distinctive first impression, it will need to be particularly strong to warrant further attention from the recruiter.

In that case, it’s well worth taking the time to analyze your résumé and make sure that it is word perfect before submitting it to a recruiter. That might seem insultingly obvious, but the stark truth is that a large number of applicants fail to do this. Recruiters are constantly sent applications with glaring errors such as spelling mistakes, sloppy layout, inconsistent or even false information and buzzwords which were clearly pulled from the Internet and slapped incoherently into the résumé.

Australian payroll and contractor management company Ayers has identified the main aspects of excellent résumé writing by honing in on three categories.

Spelling/Grammar: When you’re finished writing the résumé, proofread it carefully. Ensure that you use the correct spelling for the region in which you’re applying, e.g. if you’re applying for a job in California, use the American spelling of words such as ‘labor’ and ‘aluminum’. Then proofread it again. Only use capital letters at the start of sentences or in proper nouns. When all that’s done, it’s time for another proofread. In fact, get another person to proof it for you in case you’ve missed anything.

Layout: A résumé is a professional, formal document, so use black type throughout and adopt a neutral font such as Arial or Times New Roman. The snazzy fonts and colors belong elsewhere. Ensure that your résumé is consistent in its layout and favor the use of bullet points, as this will make it easier to read than chunks of text where the recruiter is straining to determine what are the most pertinent points.

Content: This is the most important aspect of the whole lot. This is your audition for the role being advertised, so make it count. Talk yourself and your achievements up as much as you can without delving into lying territory. If the job application asked for specific skills or qualifications, address these accordingly. Support any claims you make with concrete evidence.

Follow these rules and your résumé is all the more likely to grab a recruiter’s attention. Read the infographic below for further advice.

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5 Tips for a Successful Skype Interview

12 04 2016

No matter what type of job you’re seeking (or going to seek),  odds are that you’ll do a Skype or teleconferencing interview. Companies especially love to use this to screen out candidates, as it’s quick and cheaper than flying you onsite.

Skype interviews can feel unnerving because you’re not physically in the same space as the person. But managed correctly, Skype interviews can be successful.

picjumbo.com_HNCK4011Here are my tips for a successful video interview (#4 is especially important).

  1.  Test out the technology at least half an hour  before hand and make sure your account and your microphone works.Have your interview contact’s phone and email prepped, in case there are tech issues and you need to speak with them in an alternative format.

  2.  Put your laptop on a regular desk (or kitchen table if you don’t have a desk at home),so you can recreate the same height and depth of sitting across from someone.

  3. Wear what you’d wear to an in-person interview, i.e.  a suit. At worst, you look overdressed, at best you seem prepared and professional.

  4. During interview, look straight into the webcam (important as it’s a way to make “eye” contact);  resist the urge to look at the person’s face the whole time as you’re not actually looking at him/her.
  1. End the interview with questions. This is universal, whether you’re in-person or doing a teleconferencing interview. You must ask three good questions, preferably those that get at what success in the job looks like, what traits/ attributes the company wants in that hire, etc.

Using these tips should help you nail that next Skype interview.

****For this informative post, Campus to Career thanks Mishri Someshwar!!****

About the author: Mishri Someshwar helps entrepreneurs and senior business leaders craft effective speeches, conference presentations, and anything else they need to sound good in front of investors, colleagues, conference attendees, and more. Past clients include startup founders, sales VPs and C-suite leaders. To get her answers on the three mostly commonly asked job interview questions, click here.





3 Great Tips to Explain an Employment Gap

23 02 2016

Most honest job-seekers with stellar resumes, sufficient experience and impeccable references also have gaps in their employment histories. Some of those gaps were filled with personally-enriching experiences such as hiking or swimming with dolphins. The issue is what such employment gaps signal to the prospective employer. After all, when you’re between jobs, the proper practice is to engage in worthwhile activities: volunteering, internships, freelancing, or taking classes. What happens when you’ve done none of those things? What if you simply took a break to mentally prepare for diving into a new, demanding job once the opportunity arose?

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Not everything you’ve done during your gap may have been productive, but even so, there are some things that can be used to your advantage when discussing potential employment opportunities with hiring managers. So here’s how you can explain a longer gap in your resume and land the job you’ve been searching for:

Be honest – highlight achievements during the gap

There’s no problem with owning up to being burn out or having had needed to take some time out. That’s something that everyone deals with sooner or later in life, even hiring managers. So be honest about taking some time to recompose yourself, mention a journal or a blog you’ve kept, any new publications or activities you may have engaged in. If you took time off to travel, discuss the experience: have you had the opportunity to learn a lesson that can, in any way, relate to your career? Great! Mention it, debate it, build around it.

Were you preparing for a career change? Then discuss how you collected information about this particular change during your employment gap. Be open with the hiring manager and detail how you’ve been reading, connecting with people in the industry you’re targeting and preparing for this career change. Just like people tailor their applications to make then appeal to a potential employer (here are some absolutely creative job applications, for instance), you too can explain your gap in a way that hiring managers find understandable and acceptable.

Know how to discuss why you left your previous job

Chances are that hiring managers will ask you about the reasons why you left your previous job long before they will ask about any employment gaps so be prepared to address this issue. An ideal answer follows the well-known KISS rule (keep it short and sweet). Now, there are acceptable reasons for discontinuing employment:

  • Advancement issues: you did not find the advancement opportunities that you wished for
  • Location: unreasonably long commutes/ being forced to move
  • Job Security: working for a company that was not stable
  • Prestige: wishing to work for a more prestigious company
  • Financial reward: being underpaid for your contribution and skills

Always focus on yourself and not your previous employer. Any change should be a result of your desire for growth and career improvement.

Confidently explain how you’re qualified for the job

It’s understandable that an honest conversation about an employment gap would make you uneasy, however, confidence is paramount. Remember that resume gaps are common among job seekers and hiring managers know it. Have an answer prepared and finish with a question that moves the interview back to your capabilities and the job’s requirements:

“I’ve taken advantage of this period to better educate myself and connect with successful industry professionals who’ve gone through such a massive career shift. Getting up to speed with how the job hunting process has changed also took more than I had anticipated, but all these experiences helped me grow. Here I am, determined, persistent and re-fueled. “

****For this great post, Campus to Career thanks Karl Magnussen!!****





[INFOGRAPHIC]: How to React to Weird Interview Questions

17 02 2016

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There is a growing trend among employers these days: ask really weird interview questions. So what is the purpose? Is it just to entertain them or is there something else?

Well…it may be for entertainment purposes, but there might a deeper reason behind questions such as: If you were a vegetable, what vegetable would you be?

Thanks to these questions, they can see, how a prospective new employee can react to something unexpected. It shows how interviewees can think outside of the box. Some of the questions are specially designed to determine job seeker’s analytical thinking.

So how do you react if you get this kind of question? Don’t worry. Some of the genius answers we all saw on the internet are just made up stories. Your answer doesn’t have to be especially brilliant, but it should be somehow creative.

Take your time to think about it, but don’t stare at the wall with a blank look. Try to highlight some of your strengths in your answer. Think of something that wouldn’t be a standard answer to the question. Make yourself easy to remember (in a good way)!

Google. Tesla. Apple. These are companies that we’ve heard ask really weird questions. Questions like these…

 

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****For this fun post, Campus to Career thanks our friends over at KickResume!!****